Log in
    

Warming shelter at St. Joseph Co-Cathedral

St. Joseph Co-Cathedral Parish in Burlington is believed to be the first parish in the Diocese of Burlington to make space available for an overnight warming shelter.
 
The parish is working with Spectrum Youth and Family Services in Burlington to provide space for 10 cots for homeless young persons from Nov. 6 until the end of March. The space in the parish hall is open from 5 p.m. to 8 a.m. seven days a week.
 
“Each of us is committed to serving the homeless population during the cold Vermont winters, and I am hoping that our first year in partnership will help to save the lives of young adults who would otherwise find themselves in jeopardy,” said Father Lance Harlow, rector of the co-cathedral and Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception parishes.
 
According to Mark Redmond, Spectrum’s executive director, the agency had 25 beds available to this young population of homeless persons, but that became insufficient to meet the needs. “We had a wait list, which is terrible,” he said, because that meant some youth had no place to get shelter.
 
It was his idea to approach the Catholic Church for help, an idea he said Burlington Bishop Christopher Coyne met with a “green light” and referral to Father Harlow.
 
The co-cathedral space is being used for 17- to 22-year-old homeless persons who can access dinners at other sites and then sleep at the co-cathedral hall. Snacks and a light morning breakfast are provided there, but shower and laundry facilities are accessed at a nearby drop-in center.
 
“The beauty of it is we’ve got everything nearby, except the beds. The parish hall [has] that,” Redmond said.
 
Two Spectrum staff members are on duty until 1 a.m. at the parish hall, and one staff member stays awake there from 1 to 8 a.m.
 
“Those overnight hours will have a minimum impact on the church's schedule, and if there is a conflict with evening Masses, Spectrum personnel will come in at a later time,” Father Harlow said.
 
“I am happy to be able to collaborate with Mark Redmond at Spectrum and his staff who are doing excellent work with this [young homeless] population,” Father Harlow said. “It is very much a cooperative ministry. The church has the space and Spectrum has the personnel.”
 
Asked what the collaboration says about the bishop, rector and co-cathedral parishioners, Redmond responded, “It says they’re awesome.”
 
Many of the young persons the shelter will serve have lived in poverty or numerous foster care homes. “Most have lived chaotic lives,” are behind in their education, lack job skills and have low self-esteem, Redmond said.
 
Spectrum offers a variety of programs to help them improve their lives.
 
“I see great potential in each one of them,” said Redmond, a parishioner of Holy Family/St. Lawrence Parish in Essex Junction.
 
“The Catholic Church is doing the right thing here,” he said. “It is in line with the corporal works of mercy” to shelter the homeless and feed the hungry.

This story was originally published in the Winter 2017 issue of Vermont Catholic magazine.
  • Published in Parish

Bishop Coyne: Strong net neutrality protections critical to faith community

The chairman of the U.S. bishops' Committee on Communications has urged the Trump administration to keep current net neutrality rules in place because an open internet, he said, is critical to the nation's faith communities and how they interact with their members.
 
"Without open internet principles which prohibit paid prioritization, we might be forced to pay fees to ensure that our high-bandwidth content receives fair treatment on the internet," said Burlington Bishop Christopher J. Coyne.
 
"Nonprofit communities, both religious and secular, cannot afford to pay to compete with profitable commercialized content," he said in a Nov. 28 statement.
 
The concept of an open internet has long been called "net neutrality," in which internet service providers neither favor nor discriminate against internet users or websites. Neutrality means, for example, providers cannot prioritize one type of content over another, nor can they speed up, slow down or block users’ access to online content and services.
 
On Nov. 21, the current chairman of the Federal Communications Commission announced his proposal to roll back rules on neutrality put in place in 2015 by the Obama administration.
 
Bishop Coyne urged that the current rules remain in place. "Strong net neutrality protections are critical to the faith community to function and connect with our members," he said.
 
These protections are "essential to protect and enhance the ability of vulnerable communities to use advanced technology and necessary for any organization that seeks to organize, advocate for justice or bear witness in the crowded and over-commercialized media environment," Bishop Coyne said.
 
FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said in a statement that under his plan, "the federal government will stop micromanaging the internet. Instead, the FCC would simply require internet service providers to be transparent about their practices."
 
Bishop Coyne said: "Robust internet protections are vital to enable our archdioceses, dioceses and eparchies, our parishes, schools and other institutions to communicate with each other and our members, to share religious and spiritual teachings, to promote activities online, and to engage people -- particularly younger persons -- in our ministries."
 
The FCC is scheduled to vote on Pai's proposal at its monthly hearing Dec. 14. Observers predict the vote will fall along party lines. Chairman Pai is Republican as are Commissioners Brendan Carr and Michael O'Rielly. Commissioners Mignon Clyburn and Jessica Rosenworcel are Democrats.
 
 
  • Published in Nation

Fostering a 'Culture of Vocations'

There is no doubt of the importance of the priesthood, consecrated religious life and sacramental marriage in the Church, but to foster and build these vocations, there must be a culture of vocations in each parish.
 
That was the message Rhonda Gruenewald, author of “Hundredfold: A Guide to Parish Vocation Ministry,” brought to a daylong workshop on the topic at St. Anthony Church in White River Junction Nov. 4.
 
The aim of her book — and of her presentations — is to inspire laypersons beginning or reviving a vocation ministry or committee and provide tested activities to bring about a culture of vocations in their parish.
 
Each of the 40 participants in the workshop at St. Anthony’s received a copy of the book, which gives background and ideas for a vocations ministry like a family Holy Hour for vocations, Eucharistic adoration for vocations, an altar server lunch with priests, a fish fry for vocations, seminarian trading cards, recognition of married couples at Mass and panel discussions.
 
“We are trying to create an environment where young people can hear and answer God’s call” to priesthood, consecrated religious life or sacramental marriage, Gruenewald said in her presentation entitled “Forming a Vocation-Friendly Parish.”
 
With some 3,500 parishes in the United States without a resident pastor, the number of religious sisters diminishing in many orders and many young people not considering marriage in the Church an option, this is a “clarion call to do something,” Gruenewald emphasized.
 
Though there is an uptick in the number of seminarians in some dioceses and some religious orders are receiving more new members, “we need an entity in every parish to pray and promote vocations,” she said. “We know God is calling. We have a listening problem.”
 
Members of vocations ministries must “till the soil” by making parishioners and visitors aware of vocation options and comfortable discerning God’s call for them, she continued.
 
Some suggestions: place a poster of seminarians in a prominent place in the church, include prayers for an increase in vocations in the Prayers of the Faithful at each Mass and make vocation-related materials available in parish book racks.
 
And to reach young people, it is important to reach families. “We need to equip families to talk about vocations,” Gruenewald said. “We need to get to work in age-appropriate ways when families are bringing their children to the parish.”
 
In addition to the ideas presented in her book, she provides a plethora of information on vocations ministry at vocationsministry.com.
 
Rita Baglini of Our Lady of the Snows Church in Waitsfield attended the workshop. “We have to promote vocations,” she said. “This is our faith.”
 
Even in a church like hers where many worshippers are vacationers, a culture of vocations is important so visitors can be inspired to listen to God’s call.
 
Fostering this culture of vocations can be a challenge especially in aging parishes, in the least religious state and in communities where many young people leave to find opportunities, she said.
 
But all parishes — regardless of the number of young parishioners — can be involved in vocations ministry at least with a prayer component. “Do something!” Gruenewald said, saying youth are attracted to the truth, to authentic witness for Christ and to the example of it being lived boldly.
 
Burlington Bishop Christopher Coyne thanked participants for their interest in vocations ministry and said he hoped the workshop would “bear [the] fruit” of vocations in their parishes.
 
Father Jon Schnobrich, full-time vocations director for the Diocese of Burlington, offered workshop participants an overview of vocation work in the Diocese including the Totus Tuus summer programs that cultivate a culture of vocations directly and indirectly, his visits to parishes throughout the state to preach about vocations, his visits to Catholic schools, Masses at eldercare homes at which he encourages residents to pray for vocations and summer seminarian assignments in parishes where they are “joyful witnesses” to young parishioners.
 
Children can be inspired to a vocation at any age, Gruenewald said. “We don’t know what we’re going to do to affect vocations in God’s time. We just have to keep tilling the soil.”
 
 
  • Published in Diocesan

Vermont Catholic Community Foundation tops $10 million

The Vermont Catholic Community Foundation has completed its first year of providing the Catholic community with a choice to establish endowments for what matters most to them and leave a legacy of faith for the next generation.
 
The foundation currently includes 32 funds and more than $10 million supporting Catholic ministries throughout Vermont, an increase of 12 funds and $2.5 million since June 30.
 
More than 70 people joined the Vermont Catholic Community Foundation Board of Directors and Burlington Bishop Christopher J. Coyne to celebrate a successful first year at an Oct. 25 meeting at Shelburne Museum’s Pizzagalli Center for Arts and Education. 
 
Ellen Kane, executive director of the foundation, said that it was only because of the “support and trust of so many people in the room and the grace of God who makes all things possible” that during its first year the foundation was able to establish 20 funds and $7.5 million to support Catholic schools, parishes, cemeteries, ministries and charities throughout the statewide Diocese. 
 
Kane added that most Catholic Dioceses have a community foundation separate from the Diocese to support the growth of their ministries and ensure the vitality of their parishes, schools and charities, because of a lack of funding sources for religious organizations. Out of 181 dioceses nationwide, 143 have a Catholic foundation. Many were begun in the 1980s and have grown from a few funds to several hundred.
 
“Imagine how the Catholic faith could grow in our state if every school, parish and ministry had an endowment fund that matured over time and provided a reliable source of annual income so they could focus on other things,” Kane said, “like providing scholarships to more students, increasing youth ministry and adult formation programs, providing more emergency aid to families in financial crisis, meeting the needs of more low-income elderly in our assisted living programs, and the list goes on.”
 
Jon Pizzagalli, newly appointed chair of the foundation’s board, said the foundation offers “an opportunity for the lay community to get involved in a way that wasn’t possible before.”
 
The foundation is comprised of a volunteer, mostly lay, voting board that will grow over time to represent every region of the state and give voice to the unique issues impacting each area.
 
“The days of the Catholic Church retreating are over,” Bishop Coyne said. “We have something to offer to the community, and we are here to stay.”
 
The Vermont Catholic Community Foundation is a separate 501(C)3 from the Diocese of Burlington and provides donors with a way to establish endowments for ministries that matter most to them and to leave a legacy of faith for the next generation.
 
To view the annual report and learn more about The Vermont Catholic Community Foundation visit: vtcatholicfoundation.org or contact Ellen Kane at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 
  • Published in Diocesan

Catholic radio now available

“Catholic Radio is up and broadcasting in Burlington, Winooski, Essex and South Burlington! Congratulations to Donna McSoley and all who helped her make this happen,” Burlington Bishop Christopher Coyne enthused on social media.
 
The station went live Sept. 29, the Feast of the Archangels.
 
Tune in to WRXJ, 105.5 FM for Our Lady of Perpetual Help Radio, dedicated to helping listeners grow in holiness in Jesus Christ.
 
The low-power radio station is owned by St. Francis Xavier Parish Charitable Trust; it broadcasts from St. Francis Xavier Parish in Winooski.
 
A member of the parish, Donna McSoley, landed a permit with the Federal Communications Commission to build the radio station. She now serves as its president.
 
An Oct. 1 post on the non-profit station’s Facebook page noted, “We are on the air! Tune in to 105.5 FM to hear Our Lady Of Perpetual Help Radio — your prescription for joy.”
 
Our Lady of Perpetual Help Radio’s programming purpose is evangelization and catechesis. Broadcasting from Winooski, it reaches communities in the Burlington area with its signal reaching across Lake Champlain into New York.
 
McSoley said she was relieved, excited and happy to have the station on the air. “I love listening to it in the car,” she enthused. “Now the fun part can start.”
 
She would like to include homilies of local priests, some local programming and talks on topics of Catholic interest and on topics of social issues.
 
Programming currently includes EWTN Live, Mornings with Mother, Sunday Night Prime and Women of Grace. “The EWTN content is so excellent,” McSoley said.
 
Through broadcasting scripture, sound doctrine and pastoral advice, the station is committed to helping listeners understand the Catholic faith, increase hope by preaching truth and bring about the interior conversion that is demanded in the Gospels.
 
According to its website, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Radio Inc. is faithful to the teachings of sacred Scripture, sacred tradition and the magisterium: “We hope that our encouragement will bring people in deeper union with God, and in doing so, strengthen our community. In a world that has lost its way, we offer hope and invite all to know clarity, wisdom and truth through the lens of the Church that Jesus founded, in order to bring it peace, love and light.”
 
“I want to support the Diocese to evangelize and proclaim the Gospel,” McSoley said.
 
For programming information, go to wrxj1055.org/programing.
 
 
  • Published in Diocesan

The bishops of Burlington

Each of the 10 bishops of the Diocese of Burlington has brought unique gifts to his episcopate. Here is a look at each.
 
1. Bishop deGoesbriand, the “founding bishop”
Bishop Louis deGoesbriand was the first bishop of the Diocese of Burlington, which was founded in 1853. When he died in 1899, he left behind a Church that had grown both in number of Catholics number of churches and Catholic schools; by 1891 there were eight academies and 16 parochial schools in the Diocese with seven congregations of women religious to staff them. Five priests had awaited his arrival, and the number of Vermont priests grew to 52 in 1892 thanks to his efforts to foster vocations in Vermont and recruit priests from France, Canada and Ireland. The number of churches increased from 10 to 78 during his episcopacy, and the number of Catholics grew from less than 20,000 to more than 46,000 – most Irish or French-speaking Canadians. “There is no nook, no corner, no hamlet, no village, no town, no city of this Diocese which has not been repeatedly blessed by his presence and his labors,” said a bishop during Bishop DeGoesbriand’s funeral.
 
2. Bishop John S. Michaud, the “builder bishop”
The first native-born priest ordained for the Diocese of Burlington, Bishop John S. Michaud, began his building initiatives in Newport, his first assignment after his 1873 ordination to the priesthood. St. Mary Star of the Sea Church was the first of many construction projects he would oversee in his life. In 1879 Bishop deGoesbriand summoned him back to Burlington to oversee the building of St. Joseph’s Providence Orphan Asylum. Later, he oversaw the building of St. Francis de Sales Church in Bennington before being named coadjutor bishop of the Diocese. His building efforts continued with Fanny Allen Hospital in Colchester and a hospital in St. Johnsbury. It was Bishop Michaud who advocated a bill passed by the Vermont Legislature to make the Diocese of Burlington a legal corporation. By the end of his tenure, there were 100 churches and missions serving 75,000 Catholics.
 
3. Bishop Joseph J. Rice, the “education bishop”
Through the turbulent years that included World War I, a Spanish influenza epidemic, anti Catholicism and The Great Depression, the third bishop of Burlington, Bishop Joseph J. Rice, oversaw the expansion of Catholic education as well as the opening of the deGoesbriand Hospital in Burlington, increased social services and the building of new churches in rural areas of the statewide Diocese. Several Catholic high schools opened during his episcopacy including Cathedral High School in Burlington. In 1925 the Sisters of Mercy opened Trinity College in Burlington. And during the war, the bishop educated his flock about the need for peace. “We are now face to face with the stern realities of war,” he said in a pastoral letter. “Let us now implore the God of mercy and goodness that the scourge of way may cease and that its dreadful but salutary lessons may teach mankind.”
 
4. Bishop Matthew F. Brady, the “short-term bishop”
The fourth bishop of Burlington was the first to be transferred out of the Diocese. Before Bishop Matthew F. Brady became bishop of the neighboring Diocese of Manchester, N.H., he used his six years in Vermont to reorganize Vermont Catholic Charities, organized a Diocesan Schools Office and organized the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine. He had been a Navy chaplain during World War I, and after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941, he offered his prayers and support for the “boys” overseas fighting World War II. He lent his support to the labor union movement. “Let it be clearly understood that the position of the Catholic Church…is unquestionably and unalterably on the side of the laboring man until such time as he does injustice to employers,” he once wrote. He died in Vermont during a congress of the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine as the bishop of Manchester in 1959.
 
5. Bishop Edward F. Ryan, “champion of rural churches”
Among the accomplishments of the fifth bishop of Burlington, Bishop Edward F. Ryan, were the reorganizing of societies, establishment of a Vermont edition of the Our Sunday Visitor national Catholic newspaper, encouragement of the development of Catholic youth organizations, bringing religious congregations to Vermont and building more rural churches. A champion of the rural Church, he convened at Camp Holy Cross in Colchester the first Catholic Rural Life Institute in the eastern United States. “The future of the Church in Vermont, as well as in other states, lies not in the urban population but in the rural areas,” he said. At the time, the Diocese invested $300,000 in 14 mission churches and chapels in Vermont. In less than eight years he oversaw the building of 23 churches in rural areas. He also invited religious orders and priests from his native Massachusetts to Vermont to help staff rural parishes.
 
6. Bishop Robert F. Joyce, “Vatican II bishop”
Proctor native and sixth bishop of Burlington Bishop Robert F. Joyce participated in the Second Vatican Council -- convened by Pope John XXIII in 1962 -- and presided over the changes in the Church that resulted from it. Bishop Joyce attended every session of the council. Through his correspondence with his chancellor, Msgr. Louis Gelineau, he kept abreast of what was happening at home and continued to issue orders about the running of the diocese. When the council ended in 1965, he began implementing changes like the celebration of Mass in the vernacular. He celebrated the first television Mass, and Vermont became the third Diocese in the country to give the green light for the celebration of Saturday Vigil Masses. An advocate of interfaith dialogue, Bishop Joyce promoted the reception of the Diocese as an affiliate member of the Vermont Ecumenical Council and Bible Society. “All of the things which the Vatican Council recommended I have tried to establish,” he said. “I call myself a liberal in that measure. I am, however, strongly against changing anything the Church does not recommend.” During his tenure, Bishop Joyce also faced issues relating to the Vietnam War, declining enrollment in parish schools and legalized abortion.
 
7. Bishop John A. Marshall, “the quintessential teacher-bishop”
When Bishop John A. Marshall – once a Catholic high school headmaster in his native Massachusetts --  became seventh bishop of Burlington in 1972, the Church was still feeling the effects of the Second Vatican Council, and it was up to him to see that directives from Rome were implemented and Catholic lay roles and ministries were clarified. In addition, he addressed cultural changes that affected the Church and the Green Mountain State. He taught and spoke out repeatedly and vehemently against abortion, he opposed the Equal Rights Amendment, he championed traditional family values, and he endorsed ecumenical efforts. Other topics he addressed included capital punishment, sexuality, homosexuality, gay rights legislation and the availability of condoms to inmates in Vermont correctional centers. Vermont Catholics were concerned about a myriad of justice issues during the Marshall years: poverty, hunger, homelessness, refugee resettlement, the nuclear arms race and U.S. policy in Central American to name a few. “Only … trust that God loves us can cast out fear and make us strong enough to set aside defensiveness in order to work for peace, to set aside self interest to work for justice, to set aside anger to work for mercy,” he once said. Austere by nature, he taught simplicity of life by his example. He oversaw the sale of the grand brick bishop’s residence, and he moved his quarters to a small, simple apartment in the remodeled Bishop Brady Center, the diocesan headquarters located in a former orphanage in Burlington.
 
8. Bishop Kenneth A. Angell, the “respect life bishop”
Perhaps nothing defines Bishop Kenneth A. Angell’s respect-life attitude as well as his forgiveness of the terrorists whose actions on Sept. 11, 2001, took the lives of his brother and sister-on-law. He celebrated a Mass the next day for all the victims and said he forgave the perpetrators because as a Christian he was told to forgive so he did. Though not unique in his respect-life stand, the eighth bishop of Burlington was often called upon to speak up for the vulnerable. He stood firmly against mandated abortion coverage in health care, began a Diocesan respect life phone tree to procure lobbying of state and national leaders and dedicated himself to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ efforts to “Confront a Culture of Violence.” At his request, the Vermont Knights of Columbus circulated a petition to aid the U.S. Campaign to Ban Landmines. He opposed the death penalty and launched a fax campaign to protest the execution of a Vermont native on death row. Another concern he faced was the growing shortage of priests in Vermont; he was instrumental in establishing a House of (vocation) Discernment at the Catholic Center at the University of Vermont and stressed the role of the laity in the life of the Church. In 1996 he oversaw the establishment of a Diocesan Sexual Misconduct Policy, and he dealt with the clergy abuse scandal.
 
9. Bishop Salvatore R. Matano, “bishop of authenticity”
The ninth bishop of Burlington, Bishop Salvatore R. Matano, faced unprecedented challenges as he dealt with the fallout of the priest sex abuse scandal, declining Mass attendance, fewer children in Catholic schools and an ever-increasing clergy shortage. But as he dealt with these issues, he remained steadfast in his devotion to authentic Church teaching. A strong and effective communicator, his priorities were to foster increased participation in the sacraments -- especially the Eucharist -- and to firmly uphold the teachings of the Church. He promulgated Guidelines for the Administration of the Sacraments in the Diocese of Burlington to guide both clergy and laity in the necessary preparations for and proper reception of the seven sacraments and oversaw the implementation of initiatives from Rome such as the Year of Faith and the implementation of a new translation of the Roman Missal. He invited outside priests to serve the Church in Vermont, advocated for the right to life of all persons and worked to uphold the dignity of marriage as the union of one man and one woman. He oversaw programs to protect children and vulnerable adults and the closing and merger of parishes as well as the settlement of lawsuits dealing with allegations of clergy sexual abuse.
 
10. Bishop Christopher J. Coyne, “the blogging bishop”
A former auxiliary bishop in the Archdiocese of Indianapolis, Bishop Christopher J. Coyne already had become known as “the blogging bishop” when he arrived as the 10th bishop of Burlington. Adept at using all forms of social media to educate, inform and inspire, he has strengthened the communications efforts of the Diocese while also increasing staff to work in the areas of evangelization, catechesis, worship and youth and young adult ministry. He instituted the Diocese’s Year of Creation, an intentional, heightened focus on ecological justice featuring various events, initiatives and resources to better educate Vermont Catholics and others and encourage the embracing of Pope Francis’ message in his 2015 encyclical, “Laudato Si’: On Care for Our Common Home.” Bishop Coyne has convened the first Diocesan synod since the 1960s to establish a pastoral plan for the immediate future of the Catholic Church in Vermont and to establish particular laws and policies to do so. Only two and half years into his leadership role, Bishop Coyne is laying the foundation for a stronger, more engaged Church in Vermont.
 
--Originally published in the Fall 2017 issue of Vermont Catholic magazine.
 
  • Published in Diocesan

Promoting parish vocation ministry

Rhonda Gruenewald, a vocation promoter and author of “Hundredfold: A Guide to Parish Vocation Ministry,” will be in Vermont to present a day-long workshop open to all who want to share in this mission to promote vocations in their parishes, but specifically aimed at directors of religious education, catechists and parents. 
 
The workshop will take place at St. Anthony Parish Hall in White River Junction on Saturday, Nov. 4, from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. with the option of attending the vigil Mass at 4. 
 
“Following the lead of our local shepherd, Bishop [Christopher] Coyne, and in union with the universal shepherd, Pope Francis -- who called for a Synod this fall to focus on ‘Young People, the Faith, and Vocational Discernment’ -- the Vocation Office is seeking to more intentionally engage young people in Vermont,” explained Father Jon Schnobrich, vocations director for the Diocese of Burlington.
 
Gruenewald, of Houston, also will speak to the priests of the Diocese of Burlington at the annual priest gathering in September. 
 
“Her book proposes a way to build a culture of vocations in a Diocese, beginning at the parish level,” Father Schnobrich said. “Because of the increasing demands on priests, Rhonda's vision seeks to engage the laity in the mission of promoting vocations in a way that relieves a pastor/priest from the tasks of organizing, planning and administrating different vocation events and activities in the parish.”
 
The aim of her book is to inspire laypersons beginning or reviving a vocation ministry or committee and provide tested activities to bring about a culture of vocations in their parish.
 
To find out more about this ministry, go to vocationministry.com.
 
There is no cost to attend the White River Junction workshop, but those who want to attend are asked to RSVP by Oct. 28 to Mallorie Gerwitz in the Vocation Office (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 802-658-6110 ext. 1334).
 
  • Published in Diocesan

Masses for peace, justice in wake of Las Vegas shootings

In the wake of the largest mass shooting in modern American history, Burlington Bishop Christopher J. Coyne has asked Vermont priests to celebrate Masses on the weekend of Oct. 7 “for the preservation of peace and justice.”   
 
On the night of Oct. 1, from a 32nd-floor Las Vegas casino hotel room, Stephen Paddock shot on and off for about 10 minutes at 22,000 concertgoers below at a country music festival; more than 50 died and more than 500 were wounded.
 
Among those killed was Sandy Casey, a graduate of the College of St. Joseph in Rutland.
 
Paddock’s motive is still unknown; authorities believe he killed himself before they arrived at his hotel room.
 
“In light of the terrible tragedy in Las Vegas, I ask that the ‘Mass for the Preservation of Peace and Justice’ (in the Roman Missal) be celebrated at Sunday Mass this weekend,” Bishop Coyne said in an Oct. 3 email notice to all pastors and administrators.
 
While the priests could compose their own Prayers of the Faithful, the bishop suggested these two intercessions:
 
+ “Let us pray for the victims of the mass shooting in Las Vegas. Grant eternal rest to those who have died, healing to those who were wounded and comfort and peace to all their families and friends.”
 
+ “Let us pray for our country, that we may seek to live in peace and harmony with each other in thought, word and deed.”
 

 
 
 
Subscribe to this RSS feed
Bishop's Fund Annual Appeal