Log in
    

New president named for St. Michael's College

Dr. Lorraine Sterritt, a national leader in higher education with experience at some of America’s finest institutions, has been named the 17th president of St. Michael's College.

Sterritt will be the first woman to hold the position in the college’s history. She currently serves as president of Salem Academy and College in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

The Presidential Search Committee announced its selection Jan. 26 to the St. Michael’s community. Dr. Sterritt will assume her duties as president in July 2018.

On Tuesday Jan. 30, there will be a community introduction and press conference with her.

“The committee is thrilled to have Dr. Sterritt, a scholar and experienced administrator, coming to lead the college at such a crucial time in our history,” said Mary-Kate McKenna ’80, Presidential Search Committee chair and chair of the St. Michael's College Board of Trustees.

Sterritt holds a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in French from Queen’s University Belfast and a master’s degree and a doctorate in French from Princeton University. Prior to assuming the position at Salem, she served as dean for administration at Harvard College and as a member of the faculty of arts and sciences. Prior to Harvard, she held positions as associate dean and associate vice provost and was a member of the faculty at Stanford University. Previously she had held positions at the University of Pennsylvania, Harvard and Princeton University.

“Dr. Sterritt possesses a deep love of the liberal arts and a clear vision for the future of higher education,” McKenna said. “She was the unanimous choice of the Board of Trustees, and we all look forward to working with Dr. Sterritt in the years ahead. We are at a pivotal time in higher education and Dr. Sterritt is the visionary president we need to lead St. Michael’s College boldly into the future.”

Edmundite Father Stephen Hornat, ’72, superior general of the Society of Saint Edmund and search committee member, said it is no surprise to him that out of the 65 applicants to apply, Sterritt would rise to the top of the list. “We are fortunate to attract someone of her caliber. Her graciousness and warmth mesh well with our Edmundite tradition of hospitality,” he said. “She will make a great president and will have the prayers and support of the Edmundite and larger St. Michael’s community.”

Current St. Michael's College President John J. Neuhauser said, “St. Michael's is a special place and Dr. Lorraine Sterritt is a wonderful choice to lead the college at this time.” Neuhauser said Sterritt brings “an intelligence and depth of understanding of the importance of a liberating education to our nation, and she couples this with a genuine concern for all members of the college community, students, alumni, staff and faculty. Years from now we will only grow in appreciation for the fine work of the search committee.”

Sterritt expressed her enthusiasm to join the community of St. Michael's College. “I am very excited and deeply honored to assume the presidency of St. Michael’s College,” she said. “The people with whom I met in the interview process impressed me with their dedication to learning and service to humanity grounded in Edmundite ideals. Their devotion to the welfare of humanity and to care for the environment is exemplary.”

Sterritt added that she and her husband, Bert Lain, “are thrilled to be joining the St. Michael's community.”
 
 
 
  • Published in Diocesan

College of St. Joseph Provider Scholars serve community

The College of St. Joseph in Rutland – once known as The College of St. Joseph the Provider – is providing students who might not otherwise be able to attend college with special financial aid that benefits both the students and the community.
 
The college – founded by the Sisters of St. Joseph -- is furthering its mission and addressing national concern about the rising cost of higher education by offering the Provider Scholarship Program. The scholarship for full-time undergraduate students, worth $65,500 over four years, incorporates a commitment to academic excellence, personal and professional growth and community service.
 
Each Provider Scholar is required to serve the community for a minimum of 15 hours a semester, but most do more.
 
Senior psychology majors Tammy Robitille of Lowell and Jane Cretella of Naugatuck, Conn., are among the nearly 170 Provider Scholars.
 
“Without this program, I would not be able to attend college. It’s too expensive,” Robitille said.
 
Tuition and room and board is $35,900 a year for residential students and $24,000 for commuters; both are eligible for Provider Scholarships.
 
“The reason I came here was the financial opportunity the Provider program offers,” said Cretella, an independent student raised by her grandmother and aunt.
 
She said she always has been community minded; she used to volunteer at the YMCA at home and as a Provider Scholar most of her hours this year have been done at Rutland Community Cupboard. Her service opportunity of choice last year was at Vermont Foodbank. “I know it’s helping people who need it,” she said. “I don’t feel obliged to do it; obviously I have to (to fulfill the scholarship requirements), but I have a desire to do it.”
 
A Catholic who did service work as part of her religious education, Cretella said her faith and her grandmother model an attitude of service. “It’s just the right thing to do, to help others.”
 
Likewise, Robitille is motivated by a desire to help others; much of her Provider Scholarship service has been with DREAM, a Vermont mentoring organization that builds communities of families and college students to empower children from affordable housing neighborhoods so that they may recognize their options, make informed decisions and achieve their dreams.
 
“You just do the right thing. You have an obligation to help people in need,” she said. “If somebody in town needs food, you can up some of your vegetables” and share. “If you were in a needy situation, you’d want someone to help.”
 
The Provider Scholarship Program “falls in line with the cores values of the Sisters of St. Joseph,” said Elicia Mailhiot, associate director of communications.
 
Those values include hospitality, love of neighbor without distinction, reconciliation and unity of all people with God, one another and all creation.
 
Provider Scholars have completed more than 18,000 hours of service to the greater Rutland region since the program's inception in fall 2013.
 
According to Kimberly Rupe, community engagement coordinator at the college, organizations the students serve appreciate their efforts. “The partnerships and relationships built with outside organizations have been wonderful.”
 
Among the organizations students serve are Habitat for Humanity, Loretto Home/St. Joseph/Kervick Home, Dismas House, Vermont Achievement Center, Rutland Regional Medical Center, Rutland Area Child Parent Center, Rutland County Women's Network and Shelter and Vermont Foodbank.
 
“We couldn’t do what we do without CSJ,” enthused Hanna Snyder, volunteer coordinator for Vermont Foodbank, noting that about a dozen Provider Scholars – many of them repeat volunteers – help each week to pack bags of food for weekend meals for about 1,300 students in Vermont.
 
“CSJ is invaluable,” she said. “We’ve come to rely on them,” she said of the college students. “They are great volunteers we know we can count on every single week.”
 
Rupe, herself a Provider Scholar and 2016 graduate of the College of St. Joseph, said her service at the Rutland County Women’s Network and Shelter and Green Mountain Power solar event helped build her professional network “dramatically.”
 
Applicants who are accepted to the college are eligible for consideration for the Provider Program. Provider Scholars are intellectually curious, want to make a difference on campus and in the community and have a 2.0 to 4.0 grade point average.
 
“We care about our community. Everybody has to look out for each other,” Mailhiot said.

Originally published in the Winter 2017 issue of Vermont Catholic magazine.
  • Published in Diocesan

St. Michael’s College a 2017 ‘Best College Value’

St. Michael’s College in Colchester has been named to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance’s list of the Top 300 Best College Values of 2017. Schools making the list “embody exceptional academic quality and affordability,” according to Kiplinger’s.
 
St. Michael’s also was a Kiplinger’s Best College Value of 2016.
 
Introduced in 1998, the rankings highlight public schools, private universities and private liberal arts colleges that combine outstanding academics with affordable cost, and this year combine those three categories into a single, comprehensive list. In addition, Kiplinger has ranked the top 100 best values in each category, and St. Michael’s earned a spot on the magazine’s list of “100 best values in private universities.”
 
Kiplinger assesses value by measurable standards of academic quality and affordability. Quality measures include the admission rate, the percentage of students who return for sophomore year, the student-faculty ratio and four-year graduation rate. Cost criteria include sticker price, financial aid and average debt at graduation.
 
“I’m thrilled to see St. Michael’s included on the Kiplinger’s Best Value list again this year,” said Michael Stefanowicz, St. Michael’s director of admission. “What a wonderful accolade that celebrates our campus-wide commitment to a high quality liberal arts education, as well as the innovation and care that are characteristic of our focus on affordability and retention.”
 
Janet Bodnar, editor of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine, said that with the rankings, which weigh affordability alongside academic quality, “our goal is to help students and their parents understand what’s really worth the price … [and] all 300 schools on the list are of extraordinary value, being chosen out of a universe of 1,200.”
 
At Kiplinger.com, visitors have access to the "Find the Best College for You” tool and other tools that let readers sort by admission rate, average debt at graduation and other criteria for all schools, plus in-state and out-of-state cost for public universities.
 
The complete rankings are now available online at kiplinger.com/links/colleges and will appear in print in the February 2017 issue of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, on newsstands Jan. 3.
 
St. Michael’s College, founded on principles of social justice and compassion, is a selective, fully residential Catholic college. Its closely connected community delivers internationally-respected liberal arts and graduate education. To prepare for fulfilling careers and meaningful lives, young adults there grow intellectually, socially and morally, learning to be responsible for themselves, each other and their world.
  • Published in Schools

St. Michael’s College in top 100 U.S. liberal arts colleges

St. Michael's College in Colchester is once again among the top 100 National Liberal Arts Colleges in the United States, according to U.S. News & World Report in its 2017 Best Colleges listings.

This year, St. Michael's is ranked at #99, behind only Holy Cross (#32) among Catholic colleges in the Northeast and is the fifth-best ranked among Catholic liberal arts colleges in the entire nation.

Factors that helped St. Michael's move up from last year to place again in the top 100 among national liberal arts colleges of all affiliations included excellent graduation rate, student-faculty ratio, the quality of incoming students and engagement of alumni along with other factors.

St. Michael’s President Jack Neuhauser commented on the improvement in ranking: “The faculty and staff at St. Michael's College quietly go about the day-to-day work of preparing our students for the economic, moral/spiritual and civic enterprises of the culture. It is heartening to see this translated into an improvement in our rankings. It serves as an affirmation of this good work and keeps us buoyed as we, like many other colleges on this list, face the continued challenges before us.”

Compared with Catholic colleges in its own region, St. Michael's places ahead of Stonehill College in Massachusetts (#108), St. Anselm in New Hampshire (#115) and Siena College in New York State (#122).

St. Michael’s also was listed in this year’s U.S. News rankings among “A-plus Schools for B Students.” Sarah Kelly, vice president for enrollment said, “I like the fact that we are also on the ‘A-plus schools for B students’ list because it underscores what we do best at St. Mike's. Our faculty members are passionate about teaching and mentoring their students and are wholly dedicated to their success. That is a palpable part of our community.” She noted that the list includes a number of competitive institutions that, like St. Michael's, transform good high school students into excellent college scholars.

The national liberal arts colleges in the 2017 U.S. News rankings guide -- both public and private -- emphasize undergraduate education. To be included, colleges must award at least 50 percent of their degrees in liberal arts disciplines such as languages and literature, biology, life sciences, philosophy, cultural studies and psychology.

According to U.S. News, its rankings, which group schools based on categories created by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, have grown in the past two decades into the most comprehensive research tool for students and parents considering higher education opportunities. 

St. Michael’s College, founded on principles of social justice and compassion, is a selective, fully residential Catholic college. Its closely connected community delivers internationally-respected liberal arts and graduate education. To prepare for fulfilling careers and meaningful lives, young adults grow intellectually, socially and morally, learning to be responsible for themselves, each other and their world.
 
 
  • Published in Diocesan
Subscribe to this RSS feed
Bishop's Fund Annual Appeal