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Sisters of Mercy jubilarians

The Sisters of Mercy – Northeast Community celebrated jubilees for five sisters in Vermont who, collectively, have provided nearly 350 years of service to the Green Mountain State.
 
A special liturgy at the Mount St. Mary Convent chapel in Burlington honored the jubilarian sisters on Sept. 24. After Mass, a celebratory luncheon took place at the convent for Sisters of Mercy and Mercy Associates.
 
Vermont’s jubilarian have brought the works of Mercy to schools and parishes, hospitals, nursing homes, social service agencies and food pantries throughout the state.
 
Today, they work, volunteer, pray for people in need and advocate for social justice. Their advocacy work includes participating in rallies and vigils, working for change on behalf of women, the climate and immigrants, and seeking an end to racism and violence.
 
The Vermont Sisters of Mercy marking jubilees are:
 
75th jubilarians
Sister Germaine Compagna, 94, is the founder of a hospitality ministry at Mount St. Mary Convent, which serves women who have family members in treatment at the University of Vermont Medical Center. She also serves in prayer ministry.
 
 
Sister Jane Frances Matte, 95, is a former teacher who brought Communion to people at the medical center and a local nursing home. She now serves in prayer ministry.
 
70th jubilarian
Sister Gertrude Myrick worked as an administrator at the former Trinity College in Burlington; she also served in community leadership and as community archivist. She now volunteers and serves in prayer ministry.
 
60th jubilarians
Sister Jean Marie LaFreniere taught at Mater Christi School for 32 years and now serves in prayer ministry.
 
Sister Lucille MacDonald oversees the needs of the Vermont sisters as local coordinator. She ministered in rural Maine for 34 years, serving those who are homeless and struggling by providing emergency shelters, services and housing.
 
 
In memoriam
The Sisters of Mercy in Vermont remembered Sister Claire Boissy, a 60th jubilarian, who died on Aug. 4. She served at the Institute for Spiritual Development and taught at Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington.
  
The religious community extends its gratitude to the jubilarians for their dedicated service as Sisters of Mercy. They are part of a larger jubilarian celebration in the Northeast Community, where 91 sisters with more than 5,900 total years of service are being recognized in a yearlong celebration.
 
About the Sisters of Mercy
 
In Vermont, the Sisters of Mercy sponsor Mater Christi School and Mercy Connections in Burlington and Mercy Farm in Benson. Sisters in the state have long been active in education and social justice.
 
The Sisters of Mercy—an international community of Roman Catholic women—dedicate their lives to God through vows of poverty, chastity, obedience and service.  For more than 180 years, motivated by the Gospel of Jesus and inspired by the spirit of their founder, Catherine McAuley, the Sisters of Mercy have responded to the continually changing needs of the times.
 
Through prayer and service, the sisters address the causes and effects of violence, racism, degradation of Earth and injustice to women and immigrants. The sisters sponsor and serve in more than 200 organizations that work with those in need in the United States, Central and South America, Jamaica, Guam and the Philippines.

Visit the jubilarian website (sistersofmercy.org/northeast/northeast-2017-jubilarians)
to see profiles of these sisters and write a congratulatory message.



 
 

Obituary: Mercy Sister Claire Boissy

Sister Claire Boissy (Sister Mary Bernice), 77, of the Sisters of Mercy Northeast Community, Vermont, died at the University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington on Aug. 4.
 
She was born in Winooski on Nov. 5, 1938, the daughter of Isabelle (Devino) and Arthur Boissy. She attended St. Francis Xavier School in Winooski and Mount St. Mary Academy in Burlington. She received her bachelor’s degree in English from Trinity College in Burlington and a master’s in Sacred Scripture from St. Mary's College in Norte Dame, Ind.
 
She entered the Sisters of Mercy on Sept. 8, 1957, and professed her vows on Aug. 16, 1960. She taught at Mater Christi School and Mount St. Mary Academy in Burlington and at Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington. She also taught religious education in several parishes of the Diocese of Burlington.
 
Sister Boissy served on the General Administration for the Regional Community of the Sisters of Mercy, Vermont; she also served on the Initial Formation Team and was director of novices for the regional community.
 
She was involved in national leadership, serving on the governing board for the Federation of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas; chairperson of the Leadership Board -- Religious Formation Conference and chairperson of the New England Region of the Religious Formation Conference.
 
In 1989 Sister Boissy became director of the Institute for Spiritual Development, a sponsored ministry of the Sisters of Mercy. She was also a spiritual director.
 
She is survived by her sister-in-law, Blanche Boissy; many nieces and nephews; and her sisters in religion, the Sisters of Mercy. She was predeceased by her parents, her sister Pauline, and brothers Paul and Clayton Boissy.
 
A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Wednesday, Aug. 9, at 11 a.m. in the Mount St. Mary chapel. Visiting hours will be 6 to 8 p.m. with a prayer service at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 8, at Mount St. Mary's. 
 

BioBlitz at Mercy Farm

The 39-acre Mercy Farm in Benson is home to at least 36 moth species, more than two dozen types of trees, a half dozen spore bearer varieties, two score of plants, 42 types of birds, a dozen insects and a dozen animals, eight types of aquatic life and three Sisters of Mercy.
 
It’s easy to count the sisters who live at the eco-spiritual center but difficult to count the other forms of life that call it home.
 
Thanks to a recent “BioBlitz,” the sisters have a better handle on just what is living with them on the religious congregation’s property.
 
The May BioBlitz was a 24-hour period of intense biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species on the farm.
 
According to Sister Betty Secord, program director, the survey was valuable in showing how full of life the land is and how connected each form of life is to others. “The desire came from our sense that we are connected. All of creation is interconnected,” she said.
 
According to the Mercy Farm website, “Spiritual practice invites us to contemplate and engage in the world in an intentional way that is dedicated to developing a more insightful, mature relationship with self and the world – a way that is profoundly meaningful and fulfilling.”
 
During this Year of Creation in Vermont called for by Burlington Bishop Christopher J. Coyne, the BioBlitz drew attention to the need to care for all of God’s creation. “If we’re all part of creation, all part of God’s gift of love through nature, when one part of our body hurts, we all hurt,” said Sister Secord, director of the BioBlitz at Mercy Farm. “Everything is a manifestation of God’s love.”
 
But she lamented that much of society has become “consumers” rather than “citizens,” disconnected from creation. “We are raping the Earth for comfort and profit,” she said. “We are not living within our means. We are consuming too fast for the Earth to recoup. We are taking much more than we actually need. Consumerism is a major issue.”
 
So at Mercy Farm, visitors can connect with one another, with nature and with their deepest self. “It’s important that we have places like this in the world where people can get away from everyday life and get that sense of relationship,” Sister Secord said.
 
It’s also a place where, according to the BioBlitz, visitors just might see a clover looper moth, a quaking aspen, a prickly ash, an inky cap, a hairy vetch, an ox-eye daisy or a dog violet.
 
There will also be wild geraniums, robins, crows, June bugs, caterpillars, fox, red maples and crayfish.
 
Forty-two volunteers and 30 participants attended the BioBlitz, recording their findings in categories including trees, basic botany, spore bearers, animal signs, insects, moths, aquatic life and birds. A group of naturalists lead the effort.
 
No recommendations for improvements to the farm’s ecosystem were made. “They seemed to think we have a complete ecosystem here,” Sister Secord said of the experts.
 
She plans to share the information from the BioBlitz with visitors and said it will be important information for future planning for the property.
 
The BioBlitz also included a Master Gardener display, an astronomy talk, a lesson on growing mushrooms, a bat-banding demonstration and a scavenger hunt.
 

Obituary: Sister Mary Clare Naramore

Sister of Mercy Mary Clare Naramore, 102, of the Sisters of Mercy Northeast Community, Vermont, died at Mount St. Mary Convent in Burlington on April 12, in her 73rd year of religious life.
 
She was born in Lowell on May 28, 1914, the daughter of Louise (Stephenson) and Donald Naramore. She attended Lowell grade school and Peoples' Academy in Morrisville. She also attended Strayer Business College in Washington, D.C., and graduated from the University of Vermont with a degree in education.
 
Before entering the Sisters of Mercy, she taught in Lowell Village and Westfield schools and worked as a clerk in the Valley Savings Bank.
 
She became a Catholic in 1942; she entered the Sisters of Mercy on Sept. 8, 1944, and made her profession of vows on May 16, 1947.
 
She taught in parochial schools in Burlington, Barre and Montpelier. Following her retirement from education, Sister Naramore served as a volunteer missionary to Matsu, China, for 11 years. When she returned from China, she worked in prison and hospital ministry.
 
She is survived by her nieces, Mary Speroni and Nancy Naramore; a cousin, Irene Hayes; and by her sisters in religion, the Sisters of Mercy. She was predeceased by her parents and her brother, William Naramore.
 
A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated on Tuesday, April 18, 2017, at 11 a.m. in Mount St. Mary Chapel. Visiting hours will be 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. with a prayer service at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 17, at Mount St. Mary's. 
 

Obituary: Sister of Mercy Joyce Barrett

BURLINGTON--Sister Of Mercy Joyce Barrett (Sister Mary Petronilla), 84, of the Sisters of Mercy Northeast Community died at Mount St. Mary Convent Sept. 28.
 
She was born in Burlington on Dec. 3, 1931, the daughter of Eveline (Blanchette) Barrett and Daniel Barrett. She attended Mount St. Mary grammar and high schools, received a bachelor’s degree from Trinity College in Burlington and a master’s degree from St. Michael's College in Colchester.
 
She entered the Sisters of Mercy on Aug. 15, 1949, and was professed on Aug. 18, 1952.
 
Sister Barrett taught for 25 years at Mount St. Mary, Christ the King and Cathedral Grammar schools in Burlington, Marian High School in Barre and Winooski High School. She also worked in religious education in St. Albans, was involved in peace and social justice concerns and was the coordinator of the Mercy Justice Coalition.
 
She ministered as a nurse's aide to the terminally ill at Calvary Hospital and Our Lady of Mercy Medical Center in the Bronx and as the director of health care for the Sisters of Mercy in Burlington. When she was no longer able to be in active ministry, she volunteered at Mount St. Mary Convent.
 
She is survived by her sister, Colleen Pelkey, and her husband, Harry; many nieces and nephews; her sisters in religion, the Sisters of Mercy; and many friends. She was predeceased by her parents, Daniel and Eveline Barrett; her sisters Lorraine Barrett (Sister Mary Charles), Arlene Barrett and Kathleen Dannehy; and her brother, Norman Barrett.
 
A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11 a.m. on Oct. 3, at Mount St. Mary Chapel.
 
 

Showing, sowing, growing mercy

At Mercy Farm in Benson, the Sisters of Mercy are creating a place where people can experience peace and quiet and a sense of contemplation, reverence and care for the Earth. 

Here the importance of the Earth and its care are emphasized, and visitors are encouraged to find ways they can care for it: organic gardening, recycling, composting, using solar power and reusing, for example.

Here visitors can experience God in creation; one college student returned to her Catholic faith after a visit to the farm.

Three Sisters of Mercy live on the farm that was once Lumen Christi retreat center and before that a Benedictine residence: Sister Elizabeth Secord has been at the farm since 2013 and is the program manager; Sister Holly Cloutier, the farm manager, as been here since 2010; and Sister Mary Quinn, the business manager, has lived here since 2013.

Here in the quiet, “God has a chance to get through,” Sister Secord said.

There is a plaque in the farm kitchen that reads, “Let us be silent that we may hear the whisper of God.”

Officially known as Mercy Ecology Inc. at Mercy Farm, it offers self-directed and directed retreats, group rentals (including recovery retreats and yoga) school programs including the Classroom Around Us and Human Impact on the Landscape, liturgical programs and farm experiences like preparing gardens, planting and stacking wood. Staff members also help visitors design their own programs on topics like canning, bread making and quilting.

The sisters care for the Earth through environmental education, organic gardening and sustainable living practices that include solar energy for about 85 percent of their electric needs.

Located on 39 acres ­— including eight conserved acres — the farm facilities include six bedrooms and three bathrooms for guests, a chapel/meeting room, a library, an art room and quiet space. There is a bee yard with hives and a barn with 20 solar panels. Two sheep — Bailey and Dexter — and numerous egg-laying hens live on the farm that draws guests from throughout the Northeast and from as far away as the southern states and England, Australia and Guam.

Produce from the gardens is used for guests, donated to the Fair Haven Concerned Food Shelf and shared with neighbors.

Visitors sometimes work in the gardens.

“We help [visitors] reverence the Earth and get a sense of the Earth,” Sister Secord said.

Owned by the Sisters of Mercy of the Northeast for more than a dozen years, the property is now focused on ecology; “healing of the Earth” is a focus of the religious order once primarily engaged in teaching and now also focused on women and children.

“We want to help people understand that the materialism and consumerism people experience causes us to be greedy,” Sister Secord said. “We want to help them understand the need to cut back on some of our consumption.”

She said that even though people have many “things,” many are still not spiritually fulfilled: “People still feel hungry and empty.”


                                                

‘If you are connected to the Earth, you’re fulfilled.
I see God in the Earth. I see God in all of life.’


— Sister Elizabeth Secord


                                                

 

The sisters hope to help people realize more and more that things they buy cannot fulfill them. “If you are connected to the Earth, you’re fulfilled,” she said. “I see God in the Earth. I see God in all of life.”

In his encyclical, “Laudato si,’ on Care for Our Common Home,” Pope Francis wrote: “The entire material universe speaks of God’s love, his boundless affection for us. Soil, water, mountains: Everything is, as it were, a caress of God.”

Marking the first anniversary of Pope Francis’ encyclical on the environment, the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace launched a new website dedicated to the document and efforts throughout the world to put its teaching into practice.

The site — www.laudatosi.va — “witnesses not only to the impact of the encyclical, but also the creativity and generosity of the people of God everywhere in the world,” said Cardinal Peter Turkson, council president.

Sisters of Mercy, said Sister Quinn, consider care of the Earth a “critical concern.”

They seek to address that concern through mercy and ecology. “Mercy is compassion” and includes “compassion for Earth and all living things,” Sister Secord said. 

“Doomsday predictions can no longer be met with irony or disdain. We may well be leaving to coming generations debris, desolation and filth,” the pope wrote.

People need to “get with it,” Sister Cloutier said, and realize the severity of climate change and humans’ effect on the Earth.

“Many things have to change course, but it is we human beings above all who need to change,” the pope said.

To arrange a visit to Mercy Farm, call 802-537-4531.

Article written by Cori Fugere Urban, Vermont Catholic staff writer.

Consecrated life to be celebrated at Jubilee


The convent chapel of the Sisters of Mercy motherhouse on Mansfield Avenue in Burlington is magnificent. It captures the late Victorian imagination of imposing scale and architecture with its dark wood and high ceiling. The stained glass windows depicting various saints serenely filters the morning and evening light that cascades over the sisters at prayer and at Mass. One can only imagine that if these chapel walls could talk, they would tell the fascinating and inspiring history of over a century of spiritual and corporal works of mercy performed by generations of sisters who have knelt before the Lord. In that chapel they draw from him strength, a strength to go out on mission and refreshment upon their return.

In 1872, Bishop Louis de Goesbriand invited four sisters to St. Johnsbury and then to Burlington to teach at Catholic schools. A decade later, the sisters moved into the Mount St. Mary Convent on Mansfield Avenue where they continued their teaching and visiting the poor and sick. As the spiritual, educational and corporal needs of the fledgling diocese increased, so did the sisters' response.

"We take a fourth vow," explained Mercy Sister Laura Della Santa. "In addition to the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience, the Sisters of Mercy promise 'service to the poor, the sick and the uneducated and those in need.'" During the 19th century, as Vermont villages swelled with new immigrants, the sisters found themselves establishing convents and schools across the state.

Venerable Catherine McAuley, foundress of the Sisters of Mercy in Ireland, used to instruct the sisters: "Read the signs of the times and administer to that." Sister Laura emphasized that the works of mercy never become obsolete. The signs of the times may vary in terms of specifics, but caring for the sick, the hungry, the homeless, the uneducated, and burying the dead will continue to present ministerial opportunities not only for religious and consecrated life, but for all Catholics.

During this Year of Mercy, Sister Laura hopes that graces from the Jubilee will touch the hearts of women to join their community. The key word is "community." Religious life is community life. "Here the older sisters are as much a part of our life as the younger, active sisters," Sister Laura explained as we waited to visit two of the older Sisters of Mercy. Sister Alma Levesque joined the Sisters of Mercy as soon as she graduated from Windsor High School. She is now in her mid-90s. She has performed works of mercy in Catholic schools throughout most of the state of Vermont in her long career. Down the hall from Sister Levesque is Sister Clare Naramore who is over 100 years old. Sister Clare recounted with a radiant smile how she had taken on a "new mission" of mercy when she was in her 60s – she went to China! There she spent 11 years until she was recalled under obedience at the age of 73 to retire. Both sisters gather daily to pray the rosary and attend the conventual Mass. They've never stopped being faithful to their vocations as Sisters of Mercy.

Additionally Sister Laura Della Santa speaks of the incredible partnership with the men and women actively engaged in a formal relationship with the Sisters of Mercy serving in ministry and as lay Mercy Associates. "Associates live out their commitments in independent lifestyles, answering the call to mercy within the context of their daily lives," she said.

The Judeo-Christian message of mercy is just as relevant today as it has always been. In every era God raises up men and women devoted to mercy like those stained-glass saints depicted in the Victorian chapel on Mansfield Avenue. May this Jubilee Year of Mercy inspire a new generation of religious women to go out on "new missions" in search of the poor, the sick and the uneducated and may they find their strength and refreshment in the Lord, whose "mercy endures forever." (Ps 136)

Plan to prayerfully celebrate all those who have served God and his people by attending the diocesan Year of Mercy prayer service at 3:00 p.m. on Feb. 21 at St. Joseph-Co-Cathedral in Burlington. All are invited and encouraged to attend.

Father Lance W. Harlow, pastor of Immaculate Heart of Mary in Williston and Our Lady of the Rosary in Richmond, is the diocesan chair of the Ad Hoc Committee for the Year of Faith. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 
  • Published in Diocesan

Religious congregations address changing needs of those they serve

Education. Healthcare. Childcare.

Members of some religious congregations came to the Diocese of Burlington in the 19th century to tend to the needs of the times.

Prison ministry. Parish work. Care of the Earth. Spiritual direction.

These are some of the areas in which, having discerned the changing needs of Vermont Catholics and non-Catholics alike, religious sisters and brothers and members of secular institutes are ministering today in the Green Mountain State.

And they too are experiencing changes – decreasing membership, property sales, new living situations and mergers, to name a few.

"All religious congregations are engaged in some form or another" in the challenges of adapting to the needs of the times, said Sister Irene Duchesneau, a Religious Hospitaller of St. Joseph. "Partnerships, collaborative endeavors and especially an active foundation are what we see going forward in our diocese. These realities are not losses but a compelling call to pursue our mission and heritage with the gifts of a committed laity."

Those who live a consecrated life – members of religious orders and secular institutes – do God's work and help to build the Kingdom of God in Vermont, working in collaboration with the priests, parishioners and other people of the diocese.

Though membership in religious orders has dwindled in Vermont, their presence is no less valuable and important to the people to whom they minister. Some communities – like the Society of St. Edmund – continue to be about the Lord's work with fewer members. But some once-Vermont-based orders – like the Sisters of Mercy and Sisters of St. Joseph – have joined together with sister communities.

The Sisters of St. Joseph that were once part of the Rutland-based congregation, now number only 15 within the larger Springfield, Mass.-based order.

Other congregations are represented in the state by one or two members, some are new to the diocese, and others have left Vermont. Some have invited laypersons to join them in mission as associates and agrégées.

But the impact of those living consecrated life continues to be felt throughout the statewide diocese from Isle LaMotte to Bennington, Derby Line to Brattleboro and Rutland to White River Junction.

Those that remain in the Diocese of Burlington minister in meaningful ways whether "actively" involved in parish, school or civic community life or retired and engaged in a ministry of prayer.

In many cases, those in consecrated life pass on their congregation's charisms through their ministries. For example, the Sisters of Mercy – now part of The Institute of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas – ensure board members of their ministries and partners in ministry understand and carry on the spirit of the community. The Sisters of St. Joseph – once heavily engaged in education – help school staff members to understand their ministry to youth.

At one time members of religious communities focused on the ministries of their own community; there is more and more collaboration among them now.

For example, members of women's religious communities have assisted the Edmundite Fathers and Brothers in their Southern Missions. That cooperation has been "essential," said Edmundite Brother Thomas Berube.

Some, like the Sisters of Providence in Winooski, have opened their convent to members of other orders. Religious Hospitallers of St. Joseph and Missionary Sisters of Our Lady of Africa live at the convent, creating a multi-order community there.

"It helps each community to live to their utmost," said Sister of Providence Carmen Proulx.

Brother Berube acknowledges that the Church is not as dependent on members of consecrated life as it once was because non-members have joined their ministerial efforts. "It has to be the baptized that are going to move the Church forward," he said. "Religious communities can be there to support and help and educate them to do that … . This is the age of the laity, and I think that is wonderful … . We're all in this … together with our gifts and our blessings and our drawbacks."

In many ways, religious congregations have been the first to address needs and then move into other areas once non-members can take over. That's what the Missionary Sisters of Our Lady of Africa have done in Africa, said Sister Arlene Gates: "We are the initiators, and we know the lasting work has to be done by Africans."

Even as they plan for the continuation of their ministries, members of consecrated life are – as they have done historically – looking at needs and seeking ways to address them. These areas include helping persons who suffer from drug addition, women who have been trafficked and new immigrants.

Sister of Mercy Jeannine Mercure emphasized the need to "make systemic changes in society," while noting that the sisters' work in education continues "but in a completely different way."

Through the order's Mercy Connections, immigrants receive tutoring and help in gaining citizenship, women are assisted in establishing small businesses and women who were incarcerated are helped to be reintegrated with family and society.

The sisters' mission at Mercy Farm in Benson includes helping people learn about gardening and sustainable use of the land and offering "women deprived of quiet" an opportunity to be connected to creation.

Care of the environment is a "critical concern" for the Sisters of Mercy, Sister Mercure said, as well as for other congregations.

In addition, the Society of St. Edmund continues its long history of ecumenical and interfaith endeavors and embraces the immigrant population with "charity and acceptance," Brother Berube said.

Through it all, the Eucharist is central, said Sister of St. Joseph Mary Harvey: "Daily Mass is integral to our lives."

And so is prayer.

But not only are members of consecrated life engaged in praying for others, they often offer opportunities to others for prayer. Silent prayer, prayer groups and retreats are part of Our Lady of Life, a secular institute to which Teresa Hawes belongs. "We are on that journey (to sainthood) together," she said.

"If we don't have a foundation in prayer – a real awareness of the presence of the Holy Spirit in everything we do – there is a danger for us becoming just social workers," Brother Berube said, emphasizing the importance of all social workers.

The diocese has, over the years, welcomed contemplative and cloistered religious orders as well as those involved in ministries like education and healthcare.

"While our monastic community is not an apostolic community with a direct ministry outside the monastery, from our monastic life we offer hospitality to many people who are searching for God and life in the Church and the world today," noted Benedictine Brother Richard Iaquinto, prior of Weston Priory. "We offer a haven of prayer and support to those religious and lay persons who are working formally or informally in ministry and the apostolates here in Vermont and beyond."

Benedictine Sister Laurence A.M. Couture, prioress of Monastery of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Westfield, quoted the testimony of the abbesses and prioresses of the Benedictine Congregation of Solesmes on papal enclosure. In part: "At first sight, one could believe that the enclosure of the nuns does not allow them to reach the 'existential and geographical peripheries' (Evangelii Gaudium, n. 20) to which Pope Francis is sending forth all the Church in mission following Jesus. In reality the nun sees in it one of the most incisive and efficacious means to reach the most inaccessible peripheries, those where no one can penetrate: the heart of man often shut up in sin."

During the Year of Mercy, members of consecrated life pondered just what mercy means to them.

"Mercy is incarnating in action charity," Brother Berube said.

"It is living out the tenderness and justice of love, of Jesus," commented Sister Yvette Rainville, a Daughter of the Holy Spirit.

Sister of Notre Dame Karen Pozniak said mercy is a "sense of being there for others, having a compassionate heart that is willing to help others."

Those living consecrated have been and still are doing just that.
 
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