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National Catholic Youth Conference

After the closing Mass for the National Catholic Youth Conference at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis Nov. 18, young people from different dioceses perform a dance they learned during conference. The biennial conference draws some 20,000 Catholic teenagers from across the country. (CNS photo/Natalie Hoefer, The Criterion) After the closing Mass for the National Catholic Youth Conference at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis Nov. 18, young people from different dioceses perform a dance they learned during conference. The biennial conference draws some 20,000 Catholic teenagers from across the country.
The sound of more than 20,000 teens screaming and singing along with racuous music of Christian hip-hop band TobyMac was loud.
 
The sound of the same number of youths in silent prayer was deafening.
 
These external and internal forms of praise formed bookends to the opening general session of the National Catholic Youth Conference Nov. 16 at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis.
 
After two hours of music, entertainment -- including cultural dancing by the Vietnamese Eucharistic Youth Movement -- and an entrance procession of banners from each Diocese present, the participants were greeted by Indianapolis Archbishop Charles C. Thompson.
 
Although each person came "from many dioceses, many states … and with many titles," he said, "we are first and foremost children of God. And that God who knows us desires to be known by us. … God wanted us to know him ... through a personal relationship with a human being, our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.
 
"We are beloved children of God, called by name, claimed by Christ," he continued, referring to the conference theme of "Called." "We begin this NCYC weekend by embracing that reality of who we are."
 
Chris Stefanick, an internationally acclaimed author, speaker and founder of Real Life Catholic, used humor and life experience to speak about the reality of who we are and of God's love for each person.
 
He spoke of the "love story" upon which the Catholic faith is founded.
 
"When you remove the love story, what are you left with?" he asked. "Rules that we have to follow. Rituals that we're not sure why we keep them alive but they take a lot of time. Doctrines that have nothing to do with your life. That's how the world has come to see Catholicism. … The world has forgotten the love story, and so often we've forgotten the love story."
 
That story, he said, "begins very simply with the words '(I) believe in one God.'"
So many youths today chose not to believe, he said, including an atheist who once told him that belief that God created the universe "is as stupid as a kid coming down on Christmas morning and, seeing presents under the tree, thinks, 'There are presents, therefore there must be a Santa.'"
 
"You say there's no God?" Stefanick asked. "That's like a flea not believing in the dog. That's like a kid coming down on Christmas morning and seeing presents under the tree and saying, 'Oh look! Presents! They must have exploded themselves here!' … Just so, the universe did not put itself here, and the more we learn about the universe, the more it shouts to us about the existence of God."
 
And because God's love created us, he said, no other form of love will satisfy.
 
"We feel so small in this world," he told the crowd that came from as far away as Hawaii and Alaska. "We feel so insignificant in this universe.
 
"I think God looks down from heaven and says, 'You are huge next to all this.' As big as a mountain is, can it know someone? As big as an ocean is, can it make a choice? As big as a galaxy is, can it choose to love? No, but you can. ... You're a huge deal!"

But because of human rejection of God, Stefanick continued, sin and brokenness entered the world. To applause and shouts of "Amen!" he modified the words of John 3:16 to note that therefore, "'God so loved you that he gave his only Son.' Whoa. …"
 
 
Last modified onTuesday, 21 November 2017 13:56
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