Log in
    
Submitted Article

Submitted Article

Article selections and press releases submitted for publication with Vermont Catholic. Website URL:

Rice Memorial High School students provide families with Thanksgiving baskets

SOUTH BURLINGTON—Students and members of the Rice Memorial High School community helped 21 families have a happier Thanksgiving this year by providing them with baskets of food for a Thanksgiving meal.
 
They also engaged in a bit of competition with first place basket awarded to religion teacher Patrick Welsch’s class for a Snoopy "basket,” and second place going to History teacher Christian Frenette's class. Third place went to religion teacher Marti Burt's class.
 
Every first-period class was responsible for putting together the fixings for a Thanksgiving meal. Students are encouraged to be creative in their presentation and often go above and beyond what is asked.  
 
  • Published in Schools

Msgr. McDermott makes good on pledge to have head shaved for Daddy Warbucks part

BURLINGTON--Ever wonder what a $2,000 haircut looks like? 
 
Look here:  www.dropbox.com/sh/8niadbp3ck6xt0e/AADh08qqaz3wfh5n3yFniU4ia?dl=0
 
Msgr. John McDermott is vicar general of the Diocese of Burlington and pastor of Christ the King/St. Anthony Parish.  He is playing another part on Nov. 4 and 5: Daddy Warlocks, the iconic and beloved millionaire, in Christ the King School’s production of “Annie, Jr.”
 
Daddy Warbucks is famously bald, and Msgr. McDermott is – was -- not. However, he agreed to really get in character by shaving his head -- at a cost of $1,000.
 
He challenged the community to give $1,000 within a week, with all donations going to replace the school’s aging theater lighting, and he would have his head shaved in front of the entire school.  The $1,000 goal was reached in a matter of days, but the donations kept coming in, and by the end of the challenge the school had collected more than $2,000.
 
Thursday afternoon Msgr. McDermott brought in a professional hairstylist, Lori Detore, who removed his locks on the CKS stage in front a cheering crowd. 
 
By the end of the $2,000 haircut, he looked much more the Daddy Warlocks part and the school was a big step closer to replacing the theater lighting.    
 
  • Published in Schools

Obituary: Edmundite Father Michael P. Cronogue

BURLINGTON—Edmundite Father Michael P. Cronogue, 68, died Oct. 13.
 
The son of George and Mary Cronogue, he was born on Nov. 8, 1947, in West Hartford, Conn. He was a professed member of the Society of St. Edmund for 43 years and an Edmundite priest for 39 years.
 
Father Cronogue received a bachelor of science degree in engineering from Northeastern University in 1970. He completed his master’s degree in theology at the University of St. Michael’s College in Toronto in 1976. In 2009 he was awarded a doctor of education from the University of Vermont.
 
Burlington Bishop John A. Marshall ordained Father Cronogue on May 7, 1977, at the Chapel of St. Michael the Archangel at St. Michael’s College in Colchester.
 
Following ordination to the priesthood, Father Cronogue served as parochial vicar at Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish in Selma, Ala., from 1977-80, and the next 30 years of his priesthood at St. Michael’s College as campus minister and director of the Center of Peace and Justice.
 
In 1990, he founded the Mobilization of Volunteer Efforts.
 
His commitment to the students at St. Michael’s College is acknowledged by numerous awards including the yearbook dedication from the Class of 2000; the Cesar Chavez Peace and Justice Award in recognition of his tireless championing of service, ethics and rights at St. Michael’s College; and most recently the Rev. Gerald Dupont Award presented by the Student Association of St. Michael’s College.
 
Father Cronogue served the Edmundite Community in several leadership positions from 1991-2014 as local superior of the Society of St. Edmund at St. Michael’s College, general councilor of the Edmundite Community and as superior general from 2006-2014. He also served as director of formation and vocation director of the Edmundite Community and as a member of the St. Michael’s College Board of Trustees.
 
Along with his Edmundite community, Father Cronogue is survived by his brother, Mark, of New York City; and his brother, Ronald, of North Carolina and his wife, Tina and sons, Graham and Ian from Washington, D.C.
 
Viewing will be on Thursday, Oct. 20, from 10 a.m.-12:45 p.m. in the Chapel of St. Michael the Archangel at St. Michael’s College followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 1 p.m.
 
In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to M.O.V.E. at St. Michael’s College, P.O. Box 256, 1 Winooski Park, Colchester, VT 05439.


--------------------
Read about Fr. Cronogue’s service at the Burlington Ronald McDonald House in "Serving Up Mercy" from the August 2016 issue of Vermont Catholic Magazine

 
  • Published in Diocesan

Catholic Relief Services commits $5 million to Hurricane Matthew response in Haiti

BALTIMORE, Md.--Catholic Relief Services is committing an initial $5 million to help Haiti and other countries in the Caribbean recover from Hurricane Matthew, the powerful storm that has left hundreds dead and devastated communities in this nation still recovering from the earthquake that struck in 2010.
 
“Haiti in particular has once again been struck by a tragedy,” said Sean Callahan, CRS chief operating officer. “This commitment shows that we will continue to stand with its people, offering our hand in friendship to help and support them in this time of dire need.”
 
The funds will be used to continue and expand relief work that began even before Matthew hit on Oct. 4 as CRS staff pre-positioned supplies in areas where the storm was expected to make landfall.
 
Based on the most critical needs -- still being determined as teams are reaching areas cut off by the storm -- CRS’ response will include:
 
+ Emergency shelter materials: tarps, ropes and blankets and construction of temporary shelters using local materials that are cost-effective and easy to assemble.
+ Drinking water, hygiene kits, hand-washing stations to prevent diseases outbreak. The area is still reeling from a cholera outbreak in the months following the earthquake and there is a high-risk for another outbreak.
+ Cash to families to cover their most immediate needs.
+ Living supplies, including kitchen utensils and buckets.
 
CRS teams rode out the storm in towns like Les Cayes, Dame Marie and Jeremie on Haiti’s southwest peninsula that took the hardest hit. Once it passed, they immediately began assessing damage and distributing pre-positioned supplies to help residents recover from the 140-mph winds, storm surges and as much as 40 inches of rain.
 
“We have seen roofs blown off houses, damaged homes and waters flooding the streets, but we still don’t know the full scale of the damage. We will be doing all we can to reach the most affected areas as quickly as possible,” said Chris Bessey, CRS country representative in Haiti.
 
The $5 million represents an initial commitment to the recovery of Haiti, along with the Dominican Republic, Cuba and other countries affected. It will be augmented by more funds, from both public and private sources. Rebuilding destroyed homes and restoring lost agricultural fields are expected to take years.
 
High population density, severe deforestation and decaying infrastructure make Haiti, the poorest country in the western hemisphere, particularly vulnerable to the effects of natural disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes and floods.
 
It was a hurricane that first brought CRS to Haiti in 1954 when Hazel left widespread damage and more than 1,000 dead. The agency has been at work in the country ever since.
 
For information on How to Help CRS relief efforts from Hurricane Matthew, visit
crs.org.
 
 
 
  • Published in World
Subscribe to this RSS feed
Bishop's Fund Annual Appeal