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Obituary: Deacon John Place

Deacon John F. Place, 77, died Oct. 23 after a year-long battle with cancer, his family by his side.
 
He was born in Burlington to the late Ralph and Mary (Soucy) Place.
 
He served in the U.S. Navy from 1957 to 1960. He married Joyce Larivee in 1960, and they celebrated their 57th wedding anniversary this year. He served as a deacon for more than 30 years.
 
Upon retirement from UPS he went to work with his son. In retirement he and his wife spent winters on St. George Island in Florida. An avid outdoorsman he enjoyed hunting and fishing.
 
He leaves behind his wife and his three children: Pamela Bolster (Jeff), Amy Place-Roux (Rejean) and Jon Matthew Place (Heather); his three grandchildren, Jacob and Sarah Roux and Noah Place; his nephew, Rob Larivee; his brother in-law, Robert Larivee; his brother and sister-in-law, Bernard and Marge Larivee.
 
There will be no visiting hours. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Tuesday, Oct. 31, at 11 a.m. at St. Francis Xavier Church in Winooski. Burial will be at a later date in the Vermont Veterans Cemetery in Randolph. 
  • Published in Diocesan

'Mill Girls' historical performance

A 14-member student cast at St. Michael’s College started work on Labor Day, which felt appropriate, for a new original play with music about the lives of 19th-century girls who worked the mills of New England towns like Lowell, Mass., and Winooski.
 
That rehearsal launched preparations still under way for performances on Nov. 2, 3, 4, 10 and 11 at 7 p.m. in the McCarthy Arts Center Theater. All performances are free and open to the public.
 
Created and directed by St. Michael’s theater professor, Peter Harrigan, the show “Mill Girls” features an ambitious musical score by the well-established Burlington-area talent Tom Cleary, who long has been involved with St. Michael’s Playhouse productions and other local projects. Cleary will lead a small band for performances, including his wife, vocalist and teacher Amber DeLaurentis, St. Michael’s Fine Arts Professor Bill Ellis on guitar and Stan Baker on cello.
 
“Mill Girls” as a concept for this year’s history-charged and socially conscious “Mainstage” production at the college arose as Harrigan, now in his 27th year of teaching, looked for new ways both to challenge himself as a director and teacher and to model different artistic approaches for students, he said.
 
The resulting production has been a semester-long teaching tool across multiple disciplines on the Colchester campus. For example, at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 19, in the McCarthy Recital Hall will be an “Academic Panel” discussing the issues presented by the play; Harrigan tapped a History Department colleague’s earlier research and knowledge as he wrote the play; and the student cast will present an abridged version of the play for Winooski school children based on lesson plans from colleagues in the college’s Education Department.
 
Harrigan said that in creating “Mill Girls,” he took the approach of creating a “collage” from primary sources, as he had observed and admired in earlier productions that he directed, including  “The Laramie Project,” “Mad Forest” and “Execution of Justice.” In each case, the authors used non-theatrical materials – newspaper articles, court transcripts, interviews, journal entries, to name a few – to examine historical incidents and create a script for a play, he said.
 
“When I directed these plays, I found that undergraduate actors were able to make a deeper connection to the emotional lives of the characters and the troubling incidents depicted in the plays, because it all ‘actually happened.’ With a theatrical collage project in mind, I searched for a story from the past that would speak to student performers, and audience members, in the present,” Harrigan said.
 
The fabric of history
 
He didn’t have to look very far since the Champlain Mill and the other industrial structures from the 19th century are still part of the local architectural landscape. But the stories of the original uses of the buildings and the people who labored within them are perhaps less known, he said. “As I began research on the American Woolen Company, I talked to my colleague in the History Department, Professor Susan Ouellette, about resources,” Harrigan said, “and she unveiled a sort of hidden history – the stories of young women who worked in the mills of Winooski – and many other towns, most notably Lowell, Massachusetts: how they contributed to the world but also challenged it – advocating for themselves and others.”
 
He explained how in the early 19th century, as industrialization slowly took hold in America, manufacturers found there were not enough workers to fill their mills and factories. Francis Cabot Lowell of Massachusetts wanted to erase the horror stories associated with mills in England and establish wholesome settings where farmers would allow their daughters to work. He pictured new brick factories built along rivers – to harness the power of the water, surrounded by rooming houses, supervised by the strictest of matrons and widows alongside churches, libraries and lecture halls designed to fill the young women’s leisure hours with appropriate educational and spiritual pursuits. Lowell died prematurely, but a town named for him was built in 1826, giving thousands of young women a new option for advancement in life. “Mill Girls,” through a play with music, tells their stories, in their own words.
 
Lowell was a sort of utopia in its early years, Harrigan said, but as mill-barons’ thirst for profits began to outweigh their concern for the young women’s welfare, a shift occurred. Although they were used to working long hours – sometimes 13 or more per day – the mill girls operating one machine were asked to take on two or three, and later as many as five. This made the work conditions much more challenging and even dangerous. Industrialists later decreased wages and increased the rents in the required, company-owned housing. Using the knowledge they had acquired through classes and lectures and the community bond created in their boarding houses, the young women began to push back, forming some of the earliest labor organizations in the United States. As the movement for the abolition of slavery grew, the mill girls discovered their connection to this great American sin: These underpaid young women in the North were processing the cotton picked by enslaved Africans in the South. The female operatives of Lowell and other New England cities joined with John Greenleaf Whittier and other abolitionists to advocate for justice and freedom for all.
 
 
Through the Oct. 19 “Academic Panel,” Harrigan hopes to maximize the learning potential of this unique production. Professor Susan Ouellette will share some of her extensive research on 19th-century working women in Winooski, Lowell and elsewhere; Miriam Block, director of the Heritage Winooski Mill Museum (and also a student in the college’s Graduate Education program), will talk about the museum and its mission; Harrigan will describe his process of assembling and adapting the play from primary source material; and Professor John Devlin will lead a tour of the partially completed "Mill Girls" set that he designed and talk about how his research is reflected in his scenic design.
 
This event is also sponsored by the St. Michael’s College Humanities Center.
 
Another related event  “Mill Girls at the Mill,” will be Thursday, Nov. 9, when student performers will present an abridged version of the play at the historic Champlain Mill for students from the Winooski Middle and St. Francis Xavier schools. St. Michael’s education majors, led by Professors Valerie Bang-Jensen and Jonathan Silverman, will present lesson plans and activities to explain and enrich the experience.
 
  • Published in Diocesan

The Easley Family and the Holy Family

The Easley Family of St. Francis Xavier Parish in Winooski embraces the Holy Family as part of their family.
 
Parents Jordan R. H. and Leah Elizabeth Easley, both 33 and converts to Catholicism, teach their daughter, Magdalena, nearly 2, that Jesus, Mary and Joseph are integral members of their family.
 
Before they became members of the Church at Easter 2016, the Easleys learned that they were infertile. “As the months turned into years with no children, we began to ask the Lord more intentionally, ‘What does it mean to be a family?’” Mr. Easley said. “And almost without knowing it, we began to realize that our values lined up with the Roman Catholic teaching on marriage and family. It was not up to us to control how God gave us children; it was up to us to obey.”
 
For them, that obedience meant care for the fatherless. Thus, through a long and arduous process with Department for Children and Families, they were matched with their son, Judah, in 2013.
 
In the two weeks that they cared for him, two moments stand out for Mr. Easley, a catechist at four area Catholic churches.
 
The first was their last night in the hospital. Judah had been cleared to go home with them the following morning, so the family had a private room where Mrs. Easley held him; her husband watched in wonder. “The room was charged with holy awe, like at the Nativity. I said to Leah, ‘This is the happiest moment of my life,’” he recalled.
 
The second moment came a few days later, when the Department for Children and Families took Judah away. (There is a time between when a child joins a family and when the adoption is finished during which the biological parents can change their minds.)
 
“In so short a span of time, I also came to the saddest moment of my life,”
he said.
 
In prayer, Mr. Easley said the Lord said, “Jordan, my family was there with you. My mother, Mary, and my [foster] father, Joseph, were in the hospital with you and Leah and Judah. They were weeping with you as you baptized him together. My family is my gift to your family.”
 
Since then, the Easleys have included the Holy Family in their prayers.
 
Mr. Easley consecrates himself and his family to the Holy Family every day.
 
The rosary is the foundation of his prayer life. “Every bead and every mystery is imbued with meaning,” said Mr. Easely who was raised in a Southern Baptist home in Memphis, Tenn. “I am learning to bring Mary and Joseph into every conversation that I have with Jesus. They are the best parents and prayer partners that I could ask for.”
 
His wife, a native of Rockport, Maine, is a religion teacher at Mater Christi School in Burlington. Her family attended a Presbyterian church for most of her childhood.
 
“Mary’s first role and Joseph’s first role is to bring us to their son and their son’s father,” she said. “There have been a few times in my life when I wasn’t able to pray, but, after talking with Mary or Joseph, even for only a minute or two, I could. In those moments, they bridged a chasm I could not bridge on my own.”
 
She sees Mary not so much as a role model as a co-parent. “We explicitly teach our daughter that Mary is her mother too, and we tell her she can always talk to Mary,” Mrs. Easley said. “When I fail as mother, I rest assured in the reality that she has a better Mother.”

-------
Originally published in the 2017 summer issue of Vermont Catholic Magazine.
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Published in Parish

Sewing at The Francis Center

A new sewing class at The Francis Center at St. Mark Parish in Burlington is humming along with nine students, all of African heritage.
 
Their reasons for joining the four-Saturday-morning class include making their own clothing, making alterations for themselves and their family members, making gifts and teaching others to sew.
 
One woman, a Muslim, wants to make a hijab for her daughter.
 
“It’s simple” to make the Islamic headscarf, said volunteer sewing teacher Laurie Browne of St. Francis Xavier Parish in Winooski, owner of the Triple Loop costume shop in Essex Junction.
 
“I like to share what I know about sewing,” she continued. “My faith calls me to share those gifts. It’s part of who I am.”
 
The sewing students gather with two teachers and other helpers for two or three hours each week. They speak various languages, and Claudine Nkurinziza of Winooski, one of the sewing students, translates.
 
This is her first time taking a sewing class. “It’s expensive to pay someone to sew your clothes,” she said. “I like the experience of learning and this opportunity to try something new.”
 
Eleven-year-old Jessica Mujawimana, a sixth grader at St. Francis Xavier School in Winooski, is the youngest of the sewing students. “It’s very cool,” she said of her first sewing experience. “I don’t have to ask other people to sew clothes for me.”
 
In some African cultures, men sew as a job, not women.
 
Sharon Brown of St. Francis Xavier Parish, a parish nurse, coordinates CARES Catholic Network, a cooperative health and wellness ministry of St. Francis Xavier Parish and St. Mark Parish with pastors Msgr. Richard Lavalley and Father Dallas St. Peter, respectively. She helps with the class under the CARES umbrella and said some women buy African fabric for $20 for a simple dress then must pay someone about $80 to make it: “The dresses are out of their budget.”
 
At the sewing class, the students work with donated fabric and on donated used sewing machines. Stephen Richer of St. Joseph Co-Cathedral Parish in Burlington, a former Singer Sewing Machine Co. service manager, spent about 30 hours refurbishing the 18 portable machines that were donated in various conditions. “I had the know-how, and they needed someone to do it,” he commented. “If I can help people, I’ll help. It’s how I was brought up in my faith and in my family.”
 
Richer said a new machine would cost more than $100; but the sewing class participants will receive a class sewing machine at the successful completion of the program (one per household).
 
One of the sewing teachers, Marie Boisvert of Christ the King-St. Anthony Parish in Burlington, is an experienced seamstress. “God gave me that talent,” she said. “I give of myself wherever I can.”
 
Jessica, the 11-year-old student, likes the sewing teachers, describing them as helpful, patient and experienced.
 
“It’s nice they are helping everyone no matter our race or religion or background,” Nkurinziza said. “They see us all as people wanting to learn.”
 
Students and volunteers, Brown said, are learning more about what they have in common, not focusing on their differences. “Muslim women are working with Catholic women, holding each other’s children and talking about their shared interest in sewing.” (Childcare is provided.)
 
They are all stitching together friendships and realizing, as Brown said, “We are women. We sew. This is our bond.”
 
For more information or to donate materials or funds, contact Brown at 802-922-2958 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 
 
 

Msgr. Lavalley's special devotion

A few days before Msgr. Richard G. Lavalley was ordained to the priesthood at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Burlington in 1964, his spiritual director and confessor went to his seminary room and gave him a five-by-seven-inch picture of Our Lady of Perpetual Help. He told the Rutland native he hoped on the day of his ordination he would consecrate his priesthood to Our Lady under this title.
 
He did.
 
And his devotion to Our Lady of Perpetual Help continues.
 
Now pastor of St. Francis Xavier Parish in Winooski, he begins each day standing in his room in front of an icon of Our Lady of Perpetual Help; he recites a special prayer, asking for her help to do his priestly work.
 
The icon depicts Jesus as a child, in the arms of his mother, with one small hand in her hand. Symbolically Msgr. Lavalley places his hand between theirs.
 
The Byzantine icon is believed to have its origin in the 13th-15th Century.
 
Above the mother and child are the Archangels Michael and Gabriel, hovering in the upper corners. They hold the instruments of the Passion: St. Michael holds the spear, the wine-soaked sponge and the crown of thorns. St. Gabriel holds the cross and the nails.
 
The Child Jesus is depicted as contemplating the vision of His future Passion: Frightened by the vision, he had run to his mother for consolation, not stopping to fasten his sandal. “She is His perpetual help,” Msgr. Lavalley said, explaining, “Whatever God has in store for us – sometimes laughter sometimes tears, sometimes Good Friday, sometimes Easter Sunday – it is God’s will. Our Lady stands with you.”
 
He continued, “If we give ourselves to Our Lady, she will be there” at all the events of life.
 
Msgr. Lavalley attended Christ the King School in Rutland where his first-grade teacher, the late Sister Bridget Moroney, a Sister of St. Joseph, had a profound influence on his life and became a lifelong friend. He sent her a dozen red roses each Christmas until she died to thank her for a wonderful first grade.
 
The Lavalley family moved to Burlington when he was beginning sixth grade, a decision that troubled him because he wanted to attend Mount St. Joseph Academy in Rutland for high school. Little did he know, that after his ordination he would spend 18 years at the school.
 
Instead of MSJ, he graduated from Cathedral High School in 1955 then attended seminary in Arkansas and Pennsylvania. He began his priestly ministry at St. Peter Church in Rutland and years later served as pastor of St. John the Evangelist Church in Northfield. A former vocations director for the Diocese of Burlington, he has served as a teacher at Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington, was a teacher and the principal at Mount St. Joseph Academy and was a chaplain at Norwich University in Northfield and chaplain to the Sisters of Mercy in Burlington.
 
Now 80 and the oldest pastor in the diocese, Msgr. Lavalley often preaches about Our Lady and relates his appreciation of the Annunciation. “She gives us the key to holiness. It’s one word: Yes,” he said. “Every time we say ‘yes’ to God, we are imitating Our Lady. Every time we say ‘yes’ to God, Jesus happens again in us.”
 
After the Annunciation, the angel left Mary, and “she let God be in charge; she had trust in Him,” he said.
 
People are called to be saints, he emphasized, and Our Lady can help by interceding through her prayer. “We do not worship her. We worship only God. We honor her; we honor the saints.”
 
As he looks to the future, Msgr. Lavalley keeps Our Lady close. “I don’t want to retire. I love what I do,” he said. “We desperately need priests…and that’s what I am, a priest.”
 
He loves being a priest because of the sacramental life of the Church and because of his community. “I love the people. I love this parish,” he said. “And for the most part, they love me. I know that, and I feel that.”
 
So, he said, “If Our Lady gives me some time, (I) will use it…for just being a parish priest.”
 

Prayer bracelets for Vermont Air Guard

Holly Spear-Nichols began a project to enlist prayers for deployed members of the Vermont Air National guard, and the project has taken off beyond her expectations.
 
A member of St. Francis Xavier Parish in Winooski and Benedictine Oblate at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Monastery in Westfield, Spear-Nichols took seriously the request of her pastor, Msgr. Richard Lavalley, to pray for the service men and women who were deployed in December.
 
She and a friend went to Burlington International Airport in the wee hours of the morning Dec. 8 – the Feast of the Immaculate Conception -- and stood at a fence parallel to the runway and watched 15 F-16s take off into the night, deployed to the U.S. Central Command region, which covers North Africa and the Middle East to Southeast Asia. “To see that and to feel the vibration” of the engines made her “heart go out” to the Guard members and their families.
 
For days after, they were in the forefront of her mind. “They all needed to be blanketed in prayer,” she said.
 
And then came her inspiration: Have plastic bracelets made to remind people to pray for these people.
 
The green bracelets come in adult and children sizes and have these words in yellow: Please pray for the deployed 158th Fighting Wing, VTANG.”
 
Spear-Nichols thought she’d purchase 50 to 75 to distribute to “prayer warriors,” friends and family, but by mid January she had ordered 3,000. “It has taken off like fire,” she said of the project she is funding herself, but not releasing how much she has spent. “The way this took off, definitely the Holy Spirit is involved.”
 
On the first weekend of January she went to the Air National Guard headquarters in South Burlington to distribute bracelets, and she has fulfilled requests for them from St. Michael’s College in Colchester, Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington, the American Legion post in Colchester, a local surgeon’s office and numerous Catholic parishes.

Every member of Winooski’s St. Francis Xavier School community received a bracelet at a recent school assembly.
 
“This project is a perfect fit for our school,” explained Principal Eric Becker. “The chair of our school board, Brian Senecal, is a chief master sergeant in the Air Guard and is currently deployed. Brian and his comrades and all their families are in our prayers already. We were delighted to have a visual sign of those prayers to share with everyone.”
 
The distribution of the bracelets to all the students from pre-school through grade eight and their teachers followed a weekly school Mass during which the St. Francis Xavier pastor, Msgr. Richard Lavalley, prayed for the safe return of all the deployed Guard members.
 
Spear-Nichols is the daughter of the late Brigadier General Richard B. Spear who was a commander of the Vermont Air National Guard. “What better way to honor him than to pray for the Guard he loved,” she commented.
 
She grew up in Burlington, graduated from Rice in 1972 and earned an associate’s degree in medical/secretarial studies from Champlain College in Burlington then an associate’s in medical technology from the University of Vermont in Burlington. The retired mother of two and grandmother of two worked as a medical technologist.
 
Always deeply spiritual, Spear-Nichols grew up attending St. Joseph Parish in Burlington. “I’m always about trying to serve others in prayer,” she said. “That’s the focus of a contemplative way of life.”
 
Her prayers for the Vermont Air National Guard include Liturgy of the Hours prayers, the rosary and Divine Mercy Chaplet and spontaneous prayer. “Anytime I see or feel my bracelet, I pray,” she said.
 
“Anytime you can mention how much God loves us and the power of prayer, it’s a way of building up the Kingdom of God and unites us as a family,” she said. “Prayer is very, very powerful.”
 
For more information, write to Holly Spear-Nichols at PO Box 9428, South Burlington, VT 05407-9428.
  • Published in Diocesan

A community that CARES

This is a faith community that CARES.
 
CARES Catholic Network, a cooperative health and wellness ministry of St. Francis Xavier Parish in Winooski and the Burlington parishes of St. Mark, St. Joseph Co-Cathedral and Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, is all about Compassion, Advocacy, Respite, Education and Service.
 
Housed at the former convent at St. Mark’s on North Avenue in Burlington, CARES Catholic Network is a Christ-centered, parish-based ministry dedicated to the holistic health and wellness of the community. Through assessment of people’s needs, planning and implementing health and wellness activities and reflecting on the Gospel mission of health and wholeness, CARES promotes the integration of body, mind and spirit both in volunteers and in those they serve.
 
Services and activities include transportation, home visits, a durable medical goods exchange (canes, shower chairs, commodes etc.), advocacy for immigrants, handyman services, right-to-life advocacy, blood pressure screenings and a caregiver support group.
 
CARES has a full-time parish nurse, Sharon Brown, who makes home and hospital visits, coordinates CARES services and is a liaison with other service providers.
 
The Francis Center at St. Mark Parish provides physical space and is the hub of the CARES Catholic Network. It consists of a chapel, two medium-sized multi-purpose rooms, two smaller conference rooms and a residential kitchen.
 
It is a place for community, serving others and spiritual growth.
 
At the center there is space for meetings, trainings and spiritual formation for volunteers; community prayer groups and faith formation activities; cultural/educational activities; education/support group meetings; and storage/collection space for durable medical and household goods.
 
“We are excited we can use this space to reach out to minister to the community, following our faith and doing works of mercy,” said Father Dallas St. Peter, administrator of St. Mark Parish. “The reason [for the center] is to extend the Church’s mission of mercy in this area.”
 
Services are available to everyone, regardless of religious affiliation.
 
Two of the approximately 60 people who volunteer in the CARES ministry as their time allows are Claudine Nkurunziza and her mother, Merida Ntirampeba, natives of Burundi now living in Winooski and attending St. Francis Xavier Church. “My life is to help somebody,” Ntirampeba said.
 
She and her daughter escaped the genocide in their homeland and thank God for the help they received to do so. “They were doing it [helping the mother and child] for the love of God, and I want to repay God,” she said.
 
“Many people would have just saved themselves,” Nkurunziza added.
 
St. Francis CARES – which began three years ago -- brought the family food and clothing when needed and provided transportation and nursing assistance. “Without them, I don’t know where we’d be. They really have helped,” Ntirampeba said.
 
St. Mark Parish joined the CARES Catholic Network in 2015, and the cathedral and co-cathedral parishes joined in September. “We have absolute support from the pastors and administrative assistants,” Brown said.
 
Volunteers will spend the winter identifying programs needed for the spring and summer. Already fabric and sewing machines have been donated for a spring sewing class for refugee women.
 
Marie Forcier of St. Mark’s plans to be an instructor. “I love helping out,” she said.
 
“Pope Francis tells us to take care of each other,” Brown said. “By caring for others, we show the heart of Jesus.”
 
  • Published in Diocesan

St. Stephen Parish in Winooski is a model of Bishop's Fund success

Gone are the days when members of a parish committee went door-to-door to collect for the annual Bishop’s Fund appeal; there simply isn’t parish-level personnel support to do that. So the Diocese of Burlington depends on the parish leadership -- particularly the pastors -- to promote the appeal within the parish.
 
There are several phases to the appeal. The Leadership and Major Gift phase takes place during the final week in April; at the end of May the official kickoff coincides with the In-Pew phase. The largest mailing phase with more than 30,000 letters goes out in July and is then followed by two additional phases.
 
When looking at parish successes, Shannon Tran, assistant director of appeals and operations for the Diocese of Burlington, immediately thinks of St. Stephen Parish in Winooski.
 
With 162 registered families – 80 percent of which are considered active in their parish to some degree – the parish had a Bishop’s Fund participation rate of 66 percent, “much higher than the participation rate of the entire appeal diocesan-wide, which is only about 35 percent,” Tran pointed out. “By the second week in June, they’d exceeded their goal!”
 
St. Stephen’s was the first parish to do so.
 
“We all have [Edmundite] Father [Stephen] Hornat [the pastor] to praise for that,” said parishioner Jocelyn Barton. “He has a way when he explains things to bring them to your perspective…. He speaks from the heart.”
 
She said not only did he prepare parishioners ahead of time for the In-Pew phase of the collection, he inspires people by the way he acts and speaks.
 
Father Hornat served as pastor of Queen of Peace Parish in Selma, Ala., from 2011-2014, and there parishes had only one month to complete the annual Archdiocese of Mobile fundraising appeal. “I was used to making a big pitch and promotion for the In-Pew weekend,” he said. “I relied on my experience from the South.”
 
He told St. Stephen parishioners he thought the Bishop’s Fund could be wrapped up in a month, and they responded positively. “I thought if we could do it in Mobile, we could do it here,” he said. “That was my goal.”
 
For the most recent appeal, St. Stephen’s had an average pledge of $240, a 13 percent increase from 2014. That is a 23 percent increase in pledge total for the parish from 2014, part of what Tran called a “steady increase over a three-year period.”
 
More than 80 percent of pledges were made in May and June.
 
“Overall, they’ve increased in giving, yes, but in doing so they give themselves so much more opportunity for event planning and promotion of parish collections and national collections because they have fulfilled their annual appeal participation obligation,” Tran said.  “There is a cost for managing donor lists, address verification, printing and of course postage. The earlier we apply pledges to a parish’s goal, the less follow-up is required by the diocese and parishes.”
 
The diocese and parishes work together to ensure parishioner data is correct throughout the year.
 
Father Hornat said people were surprised the parish made its goal in about three weeks. “When I told the people, they applauded,” he said. “I said, ‘see what we can do when we put our minds to it.’”
 
To foster success with the appeal, pastors are given promotional materials directly, and parish administrators are given at least weekly communications with bulletin requests and pulpit announcements from the Diocesan Office of Development and Communications. This includes a manual for assistance in appeal promotion, a video with the bishop’s message, updated information about appeal outcomes from the prior year, a statement about fund designation and in-pew materials.
 
  • Published in Diocesan
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