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Ukulele lessons

Uke-otta hear this: Children at The School of Sacred Heart St. Francis de Sales in Bennington learning to play ukuleles.
 
Free ukes.
 
Thanks to a win in a contest sponsored by Kala, a popular brand of ukuleles, the school got 45 of the instruments at no cost at the beginning of the current school year.
 
The ukulele, sometimes abbreviated to uke, is a member of the lute family of string instruments.
 
“I enjoy the ukulele; it makes a beautiful sound,” fourth grader Isabella Thurber, 9, said after a March music class during which the students worked on their ukulele skills.
 
March is Music in Schools Month.
 
“Whenever you can put an instrument in the hands of a child, it’s exciting,” enthused Principal David Estes.
 
Ken Pallman, father of fourth grader Kaelene, is a drummer who took up the uke about three years ago; he likes it so much he has 17 in his collection – including two Kalas. “It’s more fun than the recorder,” a common musical instrument for entry-level school band members, he said. “It sounds like a happy instrument. You can’t be sad and play a uke. It’s a blast.”
 
He entered a Facebook contest and encouraged others to participate, and the result was a prize of 45 ukes for the Catholic school.
 
Students in grades four and five are learning to play the ukulele during their weekly 45-minute music classes, and this is the first time the school has provided instruments. (Third graders learn to play the recorder, and like students who play in a school band, their families must provide their instruments.)
 
“We’ve never done the ukulele; we’ve done the recorder. Ukuleles are more fun,” said Ryan Maroney, 10, a fourth grader.
 
Classmate Vincent Mattison, 10, called out his enthusiasm for “Hey, Ho! Shalom” when his music teacher, Stephanie Paul, asked students to play it. “It’s slow, and you don’t have to change chords,” he said.
 
He likes the instrument because, he said, “once you learn it, you can play the guitar.”
 
The ukulele has four strings; the guitar six or 12.
 
Kaelene Pallman, 10, already is learning to play the guitar, which she said helps her with the uke. “This is easier because I know how to do the fingering” of the chords, she said.
 
Ken Pallman, inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame as a drummer in 2014, said there has been a “huge upswing” in interest in ukuleles over the past half dozen years. “I think it’s because it is an instrument anybody can pick up and at least noodle on and get somewhat proficient,” he said, adding that ukulele groups are forming throughout the country.
 
There is even one in Bennington that people of all ages attend.
 
The instrument is popular, Paul said, because it is easily grasped. “You can start to feel you’ve mastered the ukulele pretty easily, and it’s a lifetime instrument you can play.”
 
Taking ukulele lessons at school gives Sacred Heart St. Francis de Sales students “an opportunity if they are not so inclined to do something musical,” Pallman said. “Music is a wonderful thing.”
 
He said students who learn to read music increase their math proficiency because musical notes are based on math.
 
“You have to know your numbers” to learn music, said fourth grader Zoey Zazzaro, 10. “You have to get your timing right.”
 
When Paul was a child she had difficulty with long division, and in the fifth grade began playing the saxophone. Within a year and a half she was in advanced math class. “It’s getting that part of the brain turned on” that affects both music and math skills, she said.
 
She called it a “blessing” to give the children the hands-on experience of the ukulele. “They can see their progress and hopefully use this experience to be confident as they try out other instruments in their lives.”
 
Some of the ukulele players will accompany the school chorus during a performance of “Over the Rainbow” in the spring concert.
 

Students research water quality

Sarah Eustis and Katie Garret, students at Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington, are doing research to determine the health of two local streams and their impact on Lake Champlain.
 
It is more than research; it’s a way for them to put their faith in action.
 
“God created us as the caretakers of the rest of creation, so it’s our duty to protect the environment and protect other species,” Katie said.
 
The Research on Adaptation to Climate Change program in which they are participating is funded by the National Science Foundation through The Vermont Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, a program designed to fulfill the foundation’s mandate to promote scientific progress nationwide and to get students involved in research.
 
Rice has participated in the program for eight of its nine years.
 
Sarah and Katie began the project in June. It entails collecting water samples from Potash Brook and Bartlett Brook in South Burlington and sending them to St. Michael’s College for analysis regarding levels of phosphorous, suspended sediments and nitrogen. This helps determine the health of Lake Champlain, into which both streams flow.
 
The teens also collected insects from the bottom of the streams, as they are indicators of the quality of the water.
 
“Both streams are urban-impacted so we expect to find bugs that are tolerant of pollution,” said Sharon Boardman, a Rice science teacher who is working with the students on the project.
 
A third component of the students’ project is an experiment: Sarah and Katie made leaf packs – one with faux foliage, one with maple leaves and one with witch hazel leaves – to collect bugs to see if they have feeding preferences. They were analyzing those packs in January in the school lab.
 
The two students are scheduled to make a presentation at a symposium with other Vermont Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research participants in March.
 
“My main motivation is to get kids involved in doing field research…like they would do in college studying biology or ecology,” Boardman said. “Also, this gives them a chance to do original research.”
 
Sarah is considering studying environmental science in college; Katie might pursue a degree in classics.
 
Sarah sees that the project she and Katie have undertaken is contributing to care of the Earth. “We are learning that when the environment is not good we can come up with ways to fix it” like ensuring there is no construction close to the edge of streams to prevent erosion and the addition of sediment to the stream, she said.
 
Both students studied Advance Placement Biology with Boardman as juniors and are enjoying the stream project, which is an independent project and garners them no school credit.
 
The project included a week-long training last summer at St. Michael’s College in Colchester.
 
“It’s important to think of the long-term health of the environment in Vermont,” Katie said. “Polluted streams will end up killing off wildlife.”
 
Boardman wants to instill in her students the attitude of caring for the Earth that Pope Francis espouses in “Laudato Si’,” his encyclical on the topic. “We’re called to be stewards of the Earth, and by studying ecology and understanding how ecosystems work, students become better stewards of their planet.”


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Originally published in the 2017 spring issue of Vermont Catholic Magazine.
 

Good Shepherd basketball coach's success

Two hundred wins as The Good Shepherd Catholic School boys’ middle school basketball coach: It’s a milestone Daniel Hughes deserved to reach, said Dimitri Fischer, a seventh grader on his team. “He’s giving up his time to help the team,” he elaborated. “It shows Good Shepherd is a small school but we can win.”
 
And under the guidance of Hughes – in his 11th year coaching at the St. Johnsbury Catholic school team – Good Shepherd had logged 203 wins and only 62 losses as of Feb. 27.
 
The coach’s 200th win came Feb. 1 with a win over Concord School, 48-30.
 
Player Colby Garey-Wright had told the coach the night before the milestone game that it would be a special day: Colby’s birthday and the coach’s 200th win. The seventh grader celebrated his birthday sinking 25 points into the winning effort.
 
Before each game Hughes and his players pray the Hail Mary. “We pray…so nobody gets hurt and we play a good game,” Colby said. “It’s special. The whole team does it.”
 
There are 10 members of the seventh- and eighth-grade team this season; they play local middle school teams in the northern Vermont and New Hampshire area as well as St. Francis Xavier School in Winooski.
 
“Before every game we say the Hail Mary enthusiastically as a team,” Hughes said. “We pray to play the best we can. … I don’t think they’d feel comfortable taking the court without saying the Hail Mary first.”
 
Principal Lynn Cartularo called Hughes “a great example of faith.” The school has an all-female faculty and staff, so he is a good male role model. He shows his players the importance of prayer, and “they know God is their guide,” she said.
 
Hughes, a parishioner of Corpus Christi Parish who attends St. John the Evangelist Church in St. Johnsbury, served on the parish council there. He is president/owner of Celtic Marketing Food Brokers, located across the street from the church.
 
He and his wife, Mary, a teacher at Good Shepherd School and the boys’ basketball team scorebook keeper, have three children and one grandchild.
 
Hughes played basketball in junior and senior high school in Peru, N.Y., but at Siena College in Loudonville, N.Y., played rugby while earning a bachelor’s degree in business and marketing. He graduated in 1979.
 
When his son, Brendan, was a sixth grader at Good Shepherd Catholic School, he volunteered his father to help with the basketball team. Hughes laughed when he recalled that as the assistant coach, he and the head coach had one practice together with the team before the coach told Hughes he had to be away on business for six weeks. When he came back, the team had “become my team at that point,” Hughes said.
 
Through the years, he has had several assistant coaches, including Brendan when he was in high school.
 
Many of Hughes’ former players return to support the Good Shepherd team and their former coach. Current and past players signed his 200th-win basketball – about 30 signatures.
 
“I was only going to coach for a year,” Hughes said. “But I got attached to the kids. It’s very rewarding. They all come with different abilities. For some, this is the highlight of their basketball career in seventh and eighth grade. They don’t play in high school. For others, they’ve done very, very well in high school.”
 
Hughes began this season with 193 wins.  But it’s not about winning. “It has always been about the kids,” he said. “We talk a lot about being a team and not thinking less of yourself but thinking of yourself less. They grasp that concept.”
 
Before each game he tells his players to play hard, play smart as a team and have fun. “You gotta have fun,” he said with a smile.
 
And he is clear about priorities: “The first priority is God,” he emphasized. Second is family, third is schoolwork and fourth is basketball. …Video games are not in the top four.”
 
Eighth grader Carter Gingue said not only has he learned about the game of basketball from Hughes but about teamwork and leadership.
 
“The word is out. Good Shepherd is a [basketball] force to be reckoned with,” Cartularo said. Hughes “is a local celebrity in the basketball world, and he’s a blessing for us.”
 

Energy efficiency at Mount St. Joseph Academy

Mount St. Joseph Academy in Rutland is becoming more energy efficient, and that effort has gotten a boost from two bequests.
 
The bequests from alumni total more than $200,000.
 
“MSJ is looking to become more energy efficient. We have zeroed in on improving our heat efficiency by purchasing temperature controls, in particular for our gym,” explained Principal Sarah Fortier.
 
In addition, new doors for the gym that will not allow heat to escape will be purchased and heat loss because of large windows will be addressed.
 
The school will have an energy audit to help determine other areas of concern.
 
Mount St. Joseph Academy has been focused on energy efficiency for the past year.
 
“I am focused on preserving energy because how we treat our environment now will affect the children of the future,” said Fortier, who has been principal since 2014.
 
She mentioned a quote displayed in the school that states, "We did not inherit the Earth from our ancestors. We borrowed it from our children."
 
“I don't think a truer statement could be made. We need to make these changes so that the future is preserved environmentally for the generations to come,” she commented.
 
She said it is time for the school to make environmentally friendly changes. “There is no need to waste fuel for example. Fuel is a natural resource. As Catholics we believe in preserving the environment. Making changes to the building that will help do just that is not only providing a positive example to our students but it is also practicing our Catholic faith,” she said.
 
Through the energy-saving measures, the school has been “substantially cutting down on fuel costs,” Fortier said. “It is about more than saving money. It is about practicing our Catholic ideals. We are called to take care of the Earth. Making changes to the building that help us to do this shows that we care about the future.”
 
 

'MOVE' at St. Michael's College

Students at St. Michael’s College in Colchester are moving in all directions to help others.
 
Through the MOVE (Mobilization of Volunteer Efforts) program, they engage in service and justice work in four main areas: working with children and youth, hands-on programs, working to build community and service trips.
 
Working with children includes four formal mentor programs where college students are paired with local youth. Hands-on programs deal with local non-profits to work for animal justice, environmental justice and hunger and homelessness awareness.
 
The programs in working to build community involve spending time with adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities, senior citizens, migrant farm workers and others to focus on a service of presence.
 
The service trips are mostly one-week opportunities for students to experience service at sites throughout the country and world. These trips offer students opportunities to engage in service, justice and reflection outside of Vermont. The justice issues identified on the trips parallel the justice work present in local partners.
 
“MOVE exists to expand the concept of community service to embrace social justice and emphasize our connectedness to the world as defined by Catholic social teaching,” explained Lara Scott, associate director of Edmundite Campus Ministry for community services who directs MOVE. “Through our experiences of service, reflection and dialogue, we are compelled to respond through compassionate action, education and advocacy.”
 
Currently there are 62 student leaders to plan and implement MOVE’s 18 weekly local programs and 13 service trips. Nearly 600 students participate in service annually.
 
By graduation, nearly 70 percent of St. Michael’s students participate in MOVE in some way.
 
“We have an amazing opportunity to intersect service, justice and spirituality in MOVE, and our students benefit tremendously from the opportunity to explore all three areas and make meaning of them for their lives,” Scott said. “We have a strong focus on both reflection and leadership development so our students gain skills in collaboration, facilitation, relationship building, meaning making, and the like, from participating once, returning regularly to our programs and/or taking on a formal student leadership role within MOVE.”
 
Students build relationships with peers, get connected in the larger community, are part of meeting needs in the community and therefore are part of social change. “Students find community and sense of belonging, they are able to put faith into action, and they explore their own faith in new and different ways through MOVE,” Scott continued. “MOVE benefits students because we remind students that we are all connected, that we all matter and that each one of us can individually make change.”
 
This all is done in light of the Catholic faith and with Catholic social teaching at the foundation, and MOVE is guided and driven by the Edmundite tradition of hospitality and presence of service.
 
Daniel Ramos, a senior accounting major, is highly engaged in service as a core team leader for the Habitat for Humanity chapter at St. Michael’s. He participates in the extended service programs, Best Buddies, Penguin Plunge and helps plan Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week.
 
He said working with MOVE has been one of the best experiences he has had: “Working as a leader for Habitat for Humanity, I've learned how to handle responsibilities of leading and organizing trips. I've learned what my role is when supporting causes I believe in. The genuine care and love that I see from the other core team leaders and from the people who work in the MOVE office has had a large influence on the person I've become today.”
 
Volunteering is part of who he is. “The more I've worked with MOVE the more the reason why I volunteer has evolved. After each year has passed I've gained a deeper understanding and appreciation for what MOVE accomplishes,” said Ramos, of Trumbull, Conn. “I volunteer to be a part of the positive change that MOVE brings. By organizing, leading and participating in trips through MOVE, I've been able to bring a positive change to peoples' lives.”
 
The community benefits by having “thoughtful, caring, justice-minded individuals present in their organizations and with those who use their services,” Scott said. “We are regularly present in the local, national and global community working to make change, be present with and serve where needed.” 
 
In 1990, the late Edmundite Father Michael Cronogue founded the Mobilization of Volunteer Efforts.
 
It is based on the mission of St. Michael’s College to contribute to the development of human culture and enhancement of the human person in light of the Catholic faith.
 
Service to the poor is part of the heritage and practice of the Society of St. Edmund, the founders of the college.
 
MOVE has been integral to the college career of Erin Buckley, a senior majoring in environmental science with a peace and justice minor from Haddam, Conn. “It has been an opportunity to grow as an individual and as a leader and also reach our to our local community,” she said.
 
Compassion and patience are key in her faith and in her service work.
 
Through the MOVE program she has felt a growing desire to serve others and recognize the dignity of each human being. “My experiences in service have taught me to provide space for people and ecosystems that are often silenced to speak and to be heard. I feel so blessed to be surrounded by such loving and challenging individuals,” she said.
 

Peggy Fischer wins again

Good Shepherd Catholic School prize-winning baker and cook, Peggy Fischer of St. Johnsbury, has tasted victory again, this time winning $10,000 from the "Pizza Time" episode of "Chopped Junior” that aired Jan. 31 on the Food Network.
 
“It’s really cool,” she said. “It makes me want to keep competing.”
 
Peggy, a sixth grader at the St. Johnsbury Catholic school, was one of 20 children selected to try out in 2015, then chosen to be on “Kids Baking Championship” filmed in Los Angeles. She did not make it to the final three for the finale; she was eliminated in episode seven.
 
Last year she won $10,000 on a “Kids Baking Championship” Halloween special.
 
On “Chopped Junior,” filmed late last fall in New York, she had to create three pizza courses. The appetizer was a sausage and mushroom pizza with Romesco sauce on an English muffin and the entrée was chicken masala flatbread with Tzatziki dip. For dessert, she made Gjetost glazed pizza doughnuts with clementine and raspberry mousse.
 
Contestants had to use ingredients provided in a basket but could supplement with other ingredients.
 
The daughter of Svetlana and Stephen Fischer, Peggy credits her mother as her inspiration and said the Good Shepherd School community has been “very supportive.”
 
Peggy enjoys cooking and baking because it is “very satisfying…and like a stress reliever,” she said. “And I love eating, so that’s a plus.”
 
She’s saving her cooking show winnings for college, and keeping her eye out for other competitions.
 

Diversity at Mount St. Joseph Academy

Mount St. Joseph Academy in Rutland was once a Catholic high school with a homogenous student body: local Catholics.
 
Although Catholics are still in the majority, Buddhists, Muslims, Protestants and those who have no religious affiliation are making MSJ their school of choice. They come not only from Rutland but from throughout Rutland county and from as far away as New York City, Haiti, China, Korea and Honduras.
 
“These kids are very accepting of each other,” said Principal Sarah Fortier.
 
There is a growing multi-cultural community at the high school, which this year enrolls 85 students.
 
They all take the same required Catholic religion classes, are schooled in Catholic morality and attend Mass. “It’s neat to see the Catholic religion spread,” Fortier said. “They respect it, and we respect their religion…. We are all different but accepting of each other.”
 
Fortier likes the diversity. Students of different religious affiliations and those from outside Rutland County “bring a different flavor” to the school environment, she said. “They teach others about their culture. It’s fun.”
 
She speaks about the diversity with enthusiasm because she finds it enriching not just for herself but also for the community.
 
Cedric Lyonel Andre, a senior from Haiti, likes attending school at MSJ. “I find the people here very welcoming,” he said. “I feel there is no one I can’t interact with or talk to.”
 
A young man of color, he said students at the school are motivated to be themselves and accepted for who they are. “It matters how you treat people and if you respect yourself and other people.”
 
Sophomore Fatima Hussnane, a Muslim born in the United States, agreed that the school is a welcoming place. “I’m not afraid to talk to people, even juniors and seniors,” she said.
 
In previous schools she had to deal with other students’ comments like “Your Dad is a terrorist” or “How many hand grenades do you have in your bag?”
 
At MSJ, “it’s a relief” because no one makes such comments, she said. “It’s human nature to spot the differences in people…but at MSJ there is a certain standard that is not necessarily spoken, but the aura the school is giving off is you know what you should and shouldn’t do.”
 
“We all assimilate with each other,” she added.
 
Senior Jenna Eaton said students like Fatima help others learn about different religions so they can appreciate one another’s faith. “At MSJ, we talk about and embrace the differences.”
 

Salvation Army dinners

University of Vermont students are responding to the Gospel command to serve others by preparing and serving dinners at the Salvation Army in downtown Burlington.
 
Twice a month during the school year students prepare and serve mixed vegetable salad and macaroni and cheese with ham; the Salvation Army provides the dessert.
 
They do the prep work on Thursday evenings at the Catholic Center, then return for cooking and final preparations before heading to the Main Street meal site to serve the meal; they plan to serve about 120 people in need.
 
“There is definitely a heart for service at UVM,” said Father Dwight Baker, director of the Catholic Center. The students “definitely witness to our faith in Christ and put our faith into action.”
 
During any given week during the school year, an average of about 20 students are involved in the meal program sponsored by the Catholic Center.
 
Nora Ghostlaw, a senior from Hanover, Mass., majoring in elementary and special education, has been involved in preparing meals for the Salvation Army since the end of her first year at the university. “When I first signed up to help cook and serve, I thought it would be a great way to not only get further involved in the Catholic Center but also a great way to give back to the Burlington community,” she said. “The guests that come through are so appreciative of the meal that we serve, and it is an amazing feeling to play a small part in helping the Salvation Army.”
 
Students from the center have been cooking and serving meals at the Salvation Army for about 10 years; for about eight years before that they served only.
 
Funds for the meals come from a grant from the Bishop deGoesbriand Appeal, supported by the parishes of the Diocese of Burlington.
 
The cheese for the macaroni and cheese is donated, and sometimes the pasta is too.
 
“Living on a college campus can seem like living in a bubble at times, with practically everything you need at your fingertips, but going out into Burlington and serving at the Salvation Army can really pop that bubble,” Ghostlaw said. “It is very easy to get caught up in the busyness of college life, but it is important to always take a step back to see what is happening in the world around you. I think as Catholics we are called to serve others in the likeness of Jesus and out of the goodness of our hearts, and we are so fortunate to have the amazing opportunity to do just that at the
 
Salvation Army.”
 
Taking time out of a busy schedule to cook and serve a meal “is a great way to take a step back and think about what we are really here for,” she said. “I think it can help put things in life into perspective for students.”
 

St. Michael’s College a 2017 ‘Best College Value’

St. Michael’s College in Colchester has been named to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance’s list of the Top 300 Best College Values of 2017. Schools making the list “embody exceptional academic quality and affordability,” according to Kiplinger’s.
 
St. Michael’s also was a Kiplinger’s Best College Value of 2016.
 
Introduced in 1998, the rankings highlight public schools, private universities and private liberal arts colleges that combine outstanding academics with affordable cost, and this year combine those three categories into a single, comprehensive list. In addition, Kiplinger has ranked the top 100 best values in each category, and St. Michael’s earned a spot on the magazine’s list of “100 best values in private universities.”
 
Kiplinger assesses value by measurable standards of academic quality and affordability. Quality measures include the admission rate, the percentage of students who return for sophomore year, the student-faculty ratio and four-year graduation rate. Cost criteria include sticker price, financial aid and average debt at graduation.
 
“I’m thrilled to see St. Michael’s included on the Kiplinger’s Best Value list again this year,” said Michael Stefanowicz, St. Michael’s director of admission. “What a wonderful accolade that celebrates our campus-wide commitment to a high quality liberal arts education, as well as the innovation and care that are characteristic of our focus on affordability and retention.”
 
Janet Bodnar, editor of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine, said that with the rankings, which weigh affordability alongside academic quality, “our goal is to help students and their parents understand what’s really worth the price … [and] all 300 schools on the list are of extraordinary value, being chosen out of a universe of 1,200.”
 
At Kiplinger.com, visitors have access to the "Find the Best College for You” tool and other tools that let readers sort by admission rate, average debt at graduation and other criteria for all schools, plus in-state and out-of-state cost for public universities.
 
The complete rankings are now available online at kiplinger.com/links/colleges and will appear in print in the February 2017 issue of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, on newsstands Jan. 3.
 
St. Michael’s College, founded on principles of social justice and compassion, is a selective, fully residential Catholic college. Its closely connected community delivers internationally-respected liberal arts and graduate education. To prepare for fulfilling careers and meaningful lives, young adults there grow intellectually, socially and morally, learning to be responsible for themselves, each other and their world.

St. Therese Digital Academy grants

The Diocese of Burlington’s St. Therese Digital Academy, an online Catholic high school with a rigorous program grounded in the Catholic faith, has received two grants totaling $116,000 to support the development of a digital learning platform, curriculum and marketing.
 
The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Catholic Communications Campaign awarded $96,000 and Our Sunday Visitor awarded $20,000 to provide access to a Catholic education to families limited by geography and for Catholic formation courses and catechism education for children and adults.
 
"This support will provide us with the resources necessary to develop Catholic formation courses for Catholics young and old who desire to continue to grow in their knowledge of our Catholic faith beyond the traditional means. Faith formation is no longer hindered by conflicting work, school or extra-curricular schedules," said Burlington Bishop Christopher J. Coyne. "We want to reach out to people and provide as many options as possible to grow in their faith; to do so we must embrace technology."
 
The academy works with parents in their roles as primary educators by offering an online Catholic high school with flexible options to assist in their child’s education while also providing weekly local opportunities for enrichment courses, community service projects and social and spiritual formation.
 
“This format of a Catholic high school overcomes the obstacles of no Catholic school nearby. We are serving military families whose children would otherwise not be able to have access to a Catholic education such as Okinawa, Japan,” said Lisa Lorenz, superintendent of Catholic schools for the Diocese of Burlington and principal of the digital academy. 
 
The school’s goal is to develop well-grounded disciples of Jesus Christ who possess 21st-Century skills that equip them to fulfill their roles as members of the Body of Christ within today’s society.
 
This spring plans call for offering classes to students at Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington who need specific classes to meet their requirements or are in need of advanced classes.
 
“We will be offering to our smaller high schools that cannot afford to have a large variety of courses this online format as a supplement to the rigors of their already in-person classes,” Lorenz said, referring to Mount St. Joseph Academy in Rutland and St. Michael High School in Brattleboro. “We even have students taking classes merely for enrichment. Our hopes are that we can also aid those families who may not be able to send their children to Catholic schools but really would like to have their child continue growing in the faith by studying theology classes.”
 
In addition, there will be adult theology classes for ongoing catechesis. “All of this can and will be built with the funding made possible by Our Sunday Visitor and the USCCB,” Lorenz said.
 
She has been speaking at parishes about the digital academy and has found it is met with enthusiasm, support and a sense of hope for Catholic education being restored in their communities in a 21st-Century model.
 
“Without the funds this endeavor would be impossible,” Lorenz said. “It will permit Catholic education to reach beyond brick and mortar, as well as being able to offer a more affordable Catholic high school.”
 
St. Therese Digital Academy currently enrolls five students.
 
There are three other Catholic high schools in the Diocese of Burlington: Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington, Mount St. Joseph Academy in Rutland and St. Michael High School in Brattleboro.
 
For more information about the digital academy, go to stdavt.org.
 
 
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