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Brother Carter to be ordained Edmundite priest

Edmundite Brother Michael R. Carter will be ordained to the priesthood on Saturday, Sept. 16, at the Chapel of St. Michael the Archangel on the campus of St. Michael’s College in Colchester.
 
Burlington Bishop Christopher J. Coyne will ordain him during the 11 a.m. Mass.
 
Born in Burlington, the son of Richard M. Carter and Kathleen M. Carter of Burlington attended Christ the King School there through eighth grade then Burlington High School. A member of the St. Michael's College Class of 2012, he earned a bachelor’s degree in religious studies with a minor in political science. He received a Master of Divinity degree from Boston College in 2016.
 
His current assignment as a transitional deacon is as an assistant to his Edmundite brother, Father Charles Ranges, pastor in Essex Junction and Essex Center. Brother Carter also teaches at St. Michael's College and assists in Edmundite Campus Ministry. He will continue in these roles after his ordination.
 
“I would also ask any and every person that is concerned about the state of the Church to seriously think about the men in their lives that they think may have a vocation (or might make a good priest) and mention it to them,” he said. “Be it for the Diocese, the Society of St. Edmund or elsewhere, actual talking and contact with people, and setting an example is what makes vocations appear real. Prayers are wonderful and beautiful, but prayer without action is robbing yourself of the most effective way that God works in the world.”
 
The Society of St. Edmund invites the faithful of the Diocese of Burlington and beyond to attend Brother Carter’s ordination.
 
The last ordination for the Society of St. Edmund was in 2014, when Father Lino Oropeza was ordained at St. Michael's College.

 
 
  • Published in Diocesan

Society of St. Edmund opens anniversary celebration

The Gospel story about the apostles in a boat on a stormy Sea of Galilee is essentially the story of a French religious order’s early decades after its founding 175 years ago – or, for that matter, of those founders’ spiritual heirs at a Vermont Catholic college in 2017, suggested the homilist for a historically significant Holy Day celebration at St. Anne’s Shrine in Isle LaMotte Aug. 15.
 
“Men of great faith invited by Jesus to come across turbulent waters” is how Edmundite Father Stephen Hornat, the Society of St. Edmund’s superior general, put it during the well-attended, late-morning Feast of the Assumption Mass at the shrine.
 
The liturgy officially began a year of events to note the 175th anniversary of the Edmundites’ 1843 founding at a humble and ruined former Cistercian Abbey in Pontigny, France, by Fathers Jean Baptiste Muard and Pierre Boyer, French diocesan priests who, as Fathr Hornat described, dedicated their lives to evangelism, the caretaking of holy shrines and, most significantly on this Marian Feast, to the intercessory protection and aid of Mary, the Mother of Jesus.
 
A parishioner at Winooski’s St. Stephen Church had asked him why not have the Mass at the Edmundite-founded St. Michael’s College rather than the Edmundite-administered shrine, Father Hornat said in his homily. “When I thought about it, the longest running ministry that Edmundites had during our 175-year history, wasn’t education, wasn’t retreat work, wasn’t administering parishes, but rather, caretakers of shrines (including Mont St. Michel in France and St. Anne’s in Vermont).”
 
Yet all those vital pieces of the Edmundites’ history and present mission were represented at the Mass. Most of the St. Michael’s College-based Edmundite community concelebrated, numbering a dozen or more priests and brothers, including those who administer nearby parishes. Present also were many current and former administrators of St. Michael’s College and other faculty, staff and alumni.
 
Father Hornat’s homily shed light on the order’s name and mission from its history: How St. Edmund is buried over the main altar at Pontigny Abbey where Fathers Muard and Boyer first gathered; that originally, the Edmundites were called the Oblates of the Sacred Heart; that Pontigny Abbey happened to be named in honor of St. Mary of the Assumption, “by coincidence or divine intervention,” making the day’s feast most significant to the group; or that the group didn’t become officially recognized as a Church religious order (rather than just a diocesan group) until 1876, and they didn’t become “Fathers of St. Edmund” until 1907.
 
Another guest for the day was a scholar of the history and legacy of St. Edmund who also is Anglican chaplain of St. Edmund Hall, Oxford – Rev. Will Donaldson, who at a reception and light lunch following Mass said he is traveling to sites related to the 12th/13th-century namesake of the place where he is chaplain.
 
As to his interest in Edmund given his present position, he said, “I was thinking I need to find out about him … and the more I look, the more I like it … I want to find out everything I can about him; so I’m over here in Vermont really to chat to people, meet the Edmundites, and particularly ask the question, ‘What is it about the life of St. Edmund that continues to inspire you today?’”
 
He said he and his wife are touring North America as part of research for what he expects to be about a 10,000-word short book on Edmund in three sections: first, a brief historical survey of Edmund’s life and ministry; second, a look at his character through the lens of the Beatitudes, “because I think he hits the Beatitudes on every point – the poor in spirit, those who mourn, the pure in heart, those who are persecuted, these kinds of things are his characteristics;” – and third, a look at how St. Edmund continues to influence Christian communities today, including in Vermont.
 
Other events relating to the Edmundite 175th anniversary in the coming year will include:
 
Nov. 15: St. Edmund’s Lecture and Reception at St. Michael's College.
Nov. 16: Mass at the Chapel of St. Michael the Archangel, St. Michael's College (Feast of St. Edmund).
May 13-21, 2018: Heritage Trip to France, led by Edmundite Father Marcel Rainville.
July 3, 2018: Celebration marking Fathers Muard and Bravard moving into the Cistercian Abbey in Pontigny. Mass and picnic at Holy Family Church, Essex Junction.
Aug. 15, 2018: Closing of the Anniversary Year; Mass and reception at St. Anne’s Shrine in Isle LaMotte.
 

Nonviolence workshop

Laurie Gagne would say that nonviolence is what the love of God looks like in action.
 
“Jesus calls us to stand in His place, to enter the relationship of love which He shares with the Father. The more deeply we enter this relationship, the more we experience the love of God as a passion, which propels us, as Pope Francis says, toward those who need our help,” she said. “Violence contradicts the love of God in us; therefore our actions on behalf of others must always be nonviolent. In individuals like Dorothy Day and Gandhi, we see how nonviolence can be a way of life as well as a real power for social change.”
 
Nonviolence is the “use of power in such a way that promotes the life and dignity of every human being and of all creation,” defined John F. Reuwer, an adjunct professor of nonviolent conflict resolution at St. Michael's College in Colchester. “This is contrasted with violence, which is the use of power as if someone and parts of creation are not worthy of life and dignity.”
 
The Catholic perspective on nonviolence has developed during the more than 2,000- year history of the Church.
 
“The early Church was completely pacifist,” said Gagne, former director of the Edmundite Center for Peace and Justice at St. Michael's College in Colchester and current adjunct professor of peace and justice there. “From gravestone inscriptions we know that until 170 A.D. there were no Christians who were soldiers because the early Church fathers believed that military service contradicted Jesus's command that we love our enemies.”
 
She and Reuwer are scheduled to co-facilitate a workshop, "Nonviolence: Power for Peace and Justice," on Oct. 21 at Holy Family Church in Essex Junction from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. with registration, coffee and bagels at 8:30. 
 
St. Augustine introduced the Just War Theory in the fifth century, and for the next 1,500 years, the Church taught that fighting for a just cause, using limited means, in a war declared by a legitimate authority, was the duty of Christians.
 
“Since the papacy of John XXIII, however, we find one pope after another speaking against war,” Gagne continued. Pope “Paul VI famously went before the United Nations and declared, ‘No more war! War never again!’ At the same time, there has been a turn to nonviolence as a way of resolving conflicts.”
 
The 20th century was witness to a robust Catholic peace tradition lead by Dorothy Day, Gordon Zahn and Daniel and Philip Berrigan, among others. “But what was remarkable was the advocacy of nonviolence by the Magisterium,” Gagne said, pointing to Pope John Paul II’s encyclical “Centesimus Annus” and the American bishops’ two peace pastorals. “The World Day of Peace Statement issued by Pope Francis this past January is the strongest endorsement of nonviolence by the Church thus far and indicates that it has become mainstream in Church teaching.”
 
Yet as much as the Church is promoting nonviolence today, it hasn't completely rejected the Just War Theory, and it remains a good standard for evaluating wars that are occurring, Gagne noted. “Catholics should know that according to Just War criteria, there have been almost no just wars in the modern period; modern weapons, for one thing, make the Just War principles of discrimination and proportionality hard to meet.”
 
Thus Catholics, she said, should call for nonviolent means of solving the conflicts which lead to war and support nonviolent movements for social change. They can also support groups like Christian Peacemaker Teams and the Nonviolent Peace Force who stand alongside those trapped in conflict situations.
 
“The phenomenally destructive nature of modern war has caused many people to seek alternatives to this age-old method of conflict resolution,” Gagne said. “I find it exciting that the Catholic Church is taking part in this search. By adopting the principles of nonviolence, we can be true to our pacifist origins while remaining fully engaged with the world and its problems.”
 
According to Reuwer, nonviolence is “poorly understood in our culture” because it is depicted as weak in the face of powerful evil, while violence is depicted as the strong defender of the helpless and innocent.
 
“Belief in this contrast is a major reason why war and violence are so persistent and so few resources allotted to nonviolent means of dealing with evil,” he said.
 
The workshop he and Gagne will lead presents evidence that nonviolence is the stronger force for good. “If this is true, then we can easily embrace Pope Francis's call to embrace nonviolence. Think for a moment if we put the money, creativity, and human sacrifice that we put into war and its preparations into nonviolent conflict engagement. The results, I believe, would be astounding.”
 
The public is invited to attend the workshop, "Nonviolence, Power for Peace and Justice," on Oct. 21.
 
Topics to be covered include history of Church teaching on peace and war and current teaching on nonviolence; relating the concept of nonviolence to participants personal and communal spiritual growth; how the power of nonviolent action can forge a realistic path from the Sermon on the Mount, through the harsh realities of a violent world, to the reign of God among us; how to begin, on a personal and community level, to use nonviolent power to create the relationships and the world participants seek.
 
It was presented at St. Thomas Parish in Underhill Center in May, and parts of it have been presented dozens of times in the last 20 years at various churches, colleges and public forums.
 
“Nonviolence is based on love and has no inherent contradictions, while violence is almost always based on fear and always has contradictions and unintended consequences,” Reuwer said.
 
For more information on the workshop, which will cost $10, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 
 

Obituary: Edmundite Father Paul Pinard

Edmundite Father Paul Pinard, 85, died on June 12.
 
The son of Lucien and Bibianne (Blais) Pinard, he was born on Feb. 25, 1932, in Montpelier. He was a professed member of the Society of St. Edmund for 65 years and an Edmundite priest for more than 58 years.
 
Besides his brothers in religion, Father Pinard is survived by three brothers and a sister: Francis Pinard of Barre; Richard Pinard and his wife, Paula, of Winooski; Raymond Pinard and his wife, Vivian, of Galveston, Texas; and Marguerite Marie Worthing of Omaha, Neb.
 
Father Pinard was predeceased by his parents; his sister Jeanne d'Arc Verrett and her husband, Albert, of Plainville, Conn.; his sister, Madeleine Benoit, and her husband, Leonard, of Barre; his sister-in-law, Doreen Pinard; and brother-in-law, Daniel Worthing.
 
Father Pinard completed his undergraduate degree at St. Michael's College in Colchester in 1955 and, after completing his theological studies with the Society of St. Edmund, he was ordained a priest on May 22, 1959, by Burlington Bishop Robert F. Joyce. He continued his education at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., from 1959-1960 and at Fordham University in the Bronx, N.Y., from 1972-1973, graduating with a master’s degree in religious education.
 
Father Pinard served as assistant pastor at St. Elizabeth Mission in Selma, Ala., from 1960-1961, where he was also assistant director of the Don Bosco Boys Club. He served two parishes in Quebec: St. Anastase in Greenfield Park from 1961-1964 and Holy Cross in Rosemere from 1969-1972 and again from 1989-1991.
 
He worked as director of St. Anne's Shrine in Isle LaMotte, from 1964-1968 and as administrator of St. Amadeus Parish in Alburgh from 1967-1969. Father Pinard served on the Board of Trustees of St. Michael's College from 1984-1988 and was the procurator of the Edmundite Generalate in Burlington from 1991-1995. From 1995-2004, he acted as procurator and treasurer of St. Edmund's Retreat in Mystic, Conn.
 
He retired in 2004 to the Edmundite residence in Englewood, Fla., moving in 2013 to the Edmundite residence in Selma. He returned to Vermont in 2016, residing with the Edmundite community at St. Michael's College.
 
A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at the Chapel of St. Michael the Archangel on the campus of St. Michael's College on Tuesday, June 20, at 10 a.m. Calling hours are from 8:30 to 10 a.m. at the chapel. Interment will take place at Merrill Cemetery, across the street from the college, immediately following the Mass. A reception will follow in the Edmundite dining room in Alliot Hall on the campus of St. Michael's College.  
 

Memorial Day: remembrance and gratitude

For Edmundite Father Raymond Doherty, Memorial Day is a day for all Americans to remember and pray for those in the military who sacrificed their lives in service to this nation. “We don’t want to forget!” he emphasized.
 
This year, Memorial Day is celebrated on Monday, May 29. It is a federal holiday in the United States to remember the people who died while serving in the country's armed forces.
 
Sometimes people who meet Father Doherty notice the Marine emblem on his cap and thank him for his service. “I doubt that most veterans expect that, but it is a thoughtful gesture,” commented the veteran of the United States Marine Corps during the Korean War. During 1951-1953 he received basic training in the Marine Corps at Parris Island, S.C., was subsequently assigned to Camp Lejeune, N.C., and served briefly with a guard company at the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston.
 
Because he was trained in journalism when a student at St. Michael’s College in Colchester, he was assigned as a Marine Corps journalist. At the end of two years of active duty, he acquired the title of “combat correspondent,” though he “did not experience the horrors of combat and the deadly winter weather in Korea,” he said.
 
Now, Father Doherty assists in campus ministry at St. Michael’s where he is a trustee, a member of the board of the college’s fire and rescue squads and a member of the editorial board of the alumni magazine.
 
Father Doherty ministers to veterans currently on campus and has advocated for them on the Board of Trustees. “When I was an undergraduate student at the college (1947-1951), we had many World War II vets as fellow students, and they were wonderful models for us youngsters,” he said. “I would like to see that same or similar influence of maturity for our present young students and hope that more military veterans will choose St. Michael’s College for their continued academic education. We can all learn from them and their ‘real world’ experience.”
 
As part of its commitment to serving veterans, St. Michael’s hired Ken O’Connell last summer as the new coordinator of Military Community Services to help veterans acquire the tools for fulfilling futures by connecting them with an education. “I’m here to support anyone with a connection to the military with on- and off-campus resources,” he said.
 
O’Connell served in the Army, 2nd Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment based in Grossauheim, Germany; one of his duties was to patrol the East/West German wall. He served from 1985 to 1988.
 
After leaving the Army, he returned to school and has been a first-grade teacher and school enrichment coordinator and a photographer.

The military community at the college includes about 30 students; the diverse group benefits the campus community, offering tutoring, for example.
 
One of the programs brought The Green Mountain Chapter of Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing Project to campus. “This program allows veterans and traditional students to come together, share their stories and enjoy a common activity while teaching and learning new skills together,” O’Connell said. “These skills could have to do with fishing and in a large part have to do with kindness and community.”
 
Also, “we have strong ties to our community veterans service organizations that offer services specific to the needs of our current generations of veterans and their families,” he added.
 
For O’Connell, Memorial Day is a day in which “we can take time to slow down and think about where we are, how we got here and who do we have to thank that may not be with us anymore in this physical world.”
 
There is still a war going on, but he does not think the average citizen understands what that means for many people. “I know everyone has lost someone who has meant something dear to them, and we should all think of them, and on Memorial Day we need to give a special prayer, thought or burst of energy to the ones who have died and are dying for doing what they think was right for us safely here at home,” he said. “Just let your sons, daughters and young people in your charge know that this is a day of remembrance and gratitude as well as a day of celebration for these fallen heroes.”

 

Catholic college graduations

Vermont’s two Catholic colleges conducted commencement ceremonies this month.
 
Seventy students received degrees at the College of St. Joseph’s 58th commencement ceremony May 13.
 
St. Michael’s College in Colchester marked its 110th commencement on May 14 in the Ross Sports Center; it included 456 undergraduates and 30 graduate degree recipients.
 
“It’s never about you,” said Gen. Joseph Dunford ’77, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, who told the St. Michael’s College Class of 2017 that moral courage and a commitment to serving others are essential qualities for “leaders of consequence.”
 
The nation’s highest-ranking military figure, Dunford told graduates that being a leader means doing the right thing even when it’s unpopular, and that “the greatest call is to serve.”
 
“What I’ve learned in 40 years is that extraordinary leaders are actually ordinary men and women who make a commitment to excellence” and dig down deep, he said, adding that the world will need the new graduates’ leadership given that “from a security perspective alone, the challenges we face are as complex as any we’ve faced since World War II,” while the pace of change is unprecedented. As St. Michael’s graduates, he told the class, “you are uniquely equipped” to meet those challenges.
 
Dunford called upon the graduates to “go forth to be leaders of consequence.”
 
At the College of St. Joseph, former Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas spoke of some of Vermont’s greatest challenges and how graduates can help to confront them, including the state’s declining population and its effects.
 
“So, here’s my pitch: We need each of you to be a part of our state’s future. We need you to live and work here, to make Vermont your home,” Douglas said. “To use your education to find meaningful work and perhaps create additional jobs. We need you to raise your families here and to contribute to your community and state.”
 
Douglas, the commencement speaker, also discussed his views on the decline of civil discourse and how graduates can best use their voices in discussions with others whose opinions with which they may not agree.
 
“I urge each of you to listen to different voices, to respect others when they speak and to weigh objectively the arguments they put forth. You may not be persuaded. You may become more confident in your own views,” Douglas said. “But, in a democracy, we can’t delegitimize the thoughts of others. We must allow them to be expressed. As many have said through the years, the remedy for speech you don’t like is more speech.”
 
  • Published in Schools

'MOVE' at St. Michael's College

Students at St. Michael’s College in Colchester are moving in all directions to help others.
 
Through the MOVE (Mobilization of Volunteer Efforts) program, they engage in service and justice work in four main areas: working with children and youth, hands-on programs, working to build community and service trips.
 
Working with children includes four formal mentor programs where college students are paired with local youth. Hands-on programs deal with local non-profits to work for animal justice, environmental justice and hunger and homelessness awareness.
 
The programs in working to build community involve spending time with adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities, senior citizens, migrant farm workers and others to focus on a service of presence.
 
The service trips are mostly one-week opportunities for students to experience service at sites throughout the country and world. These trips offer students opportunities to engage in service, justice and reflection outside of Vermont. The justice issues identified on the trips parallel the justice work present in local partners.
 
“MOVE exists to expand the concept of community service to embrace social justice and emphasize our connectedness to the world as defined by Catholic social teaching,” explained Lara Scott, associate director of Edmundite Campus Ministry for community services who directs MOVE. “Through our experiences of service, reflection and dialogue, we are compelled to respond through compassionate action, education and advocacy.”
 
Currently there are 62 student leaders to plan and implement MOVE’s 18 weekly local programs and 13 service trips. Nearly 600 students participate in service annually.
 
By graduation, nearly 70 percent of St. Michael’s students participate in MOVE in some way.
 
“We have an amazing opportunity to intersect service, justice and spirituality in MOVE, and our students benefit tremendously from the opportunity to explore all three areas and make meaning of them for their lives,” Scott said. “We have a strong focus on both reflection and leadership development so our students gain skills in collaboration, facilitation, relationship building, meaning making, and the like, from participating once, returning regularly to our programs and/or taking on a formal student leadership role within MOVE.”
 
Students build relationships with peers, get connected in the larger community, are part of meeting needs in the community and therefore are part of social change. “Students find community and sense of belonging, they are able to put faith into action, and they explore their own faith in new and different ways through MOVE,” Scott continued. “MOVE benefits students because we remind students that we are all connected, that we all matter and that each one of us can individually make change.”
 
This all is done in light of the Catholic faith and with Catholic social teaching at the foundation, and MOVE is guided and driven by the Edmundite tradition of hospitality and presence of service.
 
Daniel Ramos, a senior accounting major, is highly engaged in service as a core team leader for the Habitat for Humanity chapter at St. Michael’s. He participates in the extended service programs, Best Buddies, Penguin Plunge and helps plan Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week.
 
He said working with MOVE has been one of the best experiences he has had: “Working as a leader for Habitat for Humanity, I've learned how to handle responsibilities of leading and organizing trips. I've learned what my role is when supporting causes I believe in. The genuine care and love that I see from the other core team leaders and from the people who work in the MOVE office has had a large influence on the person I've become today.”
 
Volunteering is part of who he is. “The more I've worked with MOVE the more the reason why I volunteer has evolved. After each year has passed I've gained a deeper understanding and appreciation for what MOVE accomplishes,” said Ramos, of Trumbull, Conn. “I volunteer to be a part of the positive change that MOVE brings. By organizing, leading and participating in trips through MOVE, I've been able to bring a positive change to peoples' lives.”
 
The community benefits by having “thoughtful, caring, justice-minded individuals present in their organizations and with those who use their services,” Scott said. “We are regularly present in the local, national and global community working to make change, be present with and serve where needed.” 
 
In 1990, the late Edmundite Father Michael Cronogue founded the Mobilization of Volunteer Efforts.
 
It is based on the mission of St. Michael’s College to contribute to the development of human culture and enhancement of the human person in light of the Catholic faith.
 
Service to the poor is part of the heritage and practice of the Society of St. Edmund, the founders of the college.
 
MOVE has been integral to the college career of Erin Buckley, a senior majoring in environmental science with a peace and justice minor from Haddam, Conn. “It has been an opportunity to grow as an individual and as a leader and also reach our to our local community,” she said.
 
Compassion and patience are key in her faith and in her service work.
 
Through the MOVE program she has felt a growing desire to serve others and recognize the dignity of each human being. “My experiences in service have taught me to provide space for people and ecosystems that are often silenced to speak and to be heard. I feel so blessed to be surrounded by such loving and challenging individuals,” she said.
 
  • Published in Schools

Bishop to ordain 2 deacons

Burlington Bishop Christopher Coyne will ordain one man to the permanent diaconate and one to the transitional diaconate at a special Mass Feb. 11 at 11 a.m. at St. Michael’s College in Colchester.
 
Phil Lawson, director of evangelization and catechesis for the Diocese of Burlington, will be ordained a permanent deacon, and Edmundite Brother Michael Carter will be ordained to the transitional diaconate. The latter works as an Edmundite Campus Minister and teaches in the Religious Studies Department at St. Michael’s College.
 
Brother Carter said he is excited that men are being ordained to the permanent diaconate in the Diocese of Burlington. “Revitalization of this ancient ministry can only be a positive thing for the Church,” he said.
 
The last ordination of permanent deacons here was several years ago.
 
Lawson trained in the Diocese of LaCrosse, Wis., and the Diocese of Green Bay, Wis.; he has been in formation -- both formal and informal -- for about six years.
 
He approaches his ordination with “a mixture of trepidation, wonder, excitement, amazement and peace.”
 
He will be assisting at his home parish, St. Luke in Fairfax and continue to help at the Joseph House ministry in Burlington.
 
Lawson said it will be a privilege to be ordained with Brother Carter and to share in such a joyous day for both the Edmundites and the Diocese of Burlington.
 
Brother Carter’s future assignments will be according to the will of the Edmundite community; after the ordination he will continue his work at the college, at least until the end of this semester. He is scheduled to be ordained a priest on Sept. 16 at St. Michael's College.
 
The faithful of the Diocese of Burlington are invited to the ordination Mass.
 
 
  • Published in Diocesan
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