Log in
    

Celebrating a Catholic Halloween and Thanksgiving

Fall brings with it several holidays that commonly are celebrated by Christians and non-Christians alike. While the secular focus of Halloween and Thanksgiving festivities can err toward consumerism and gluttony, the Christian roots and perspectives of these celebrations offer much more to celebrants. The word “Halloween” comes from “All Hallows’ Eve” (Oct. 31), which refers to the day before All Saints’ Day (Nov. 1). The noun “hallow,” which means “saint,” derives from the Old English adjective “hallowed” with which Christians should be familiar from its use in The Lord’s Prayer (“hallowed be thy name”). In some parts of the world, attending church services and lighting candles on the graves of the dead remain popular All Hallows’ Eve traditions. Christians have been celebrating thanksgiving meals since the time of Jesus and continue to do so each time they celebrate the Eucharist. (The Greek word “eucharistia” means “thanksgiving.”) Before the American holiday was instituted by Abraham Lincoln to celebrate unity and thanksgiving, the Eucharist was instituted by Jesus Christ to unify the faithful in thanksgiving to God for all creation (Catechism of the Catholic Church 1359-1361). Below are a few ideas to celebrate Halloween and Thanksgiving the Catholic way.
 
Saintly sweets
Having a party? Here are some ideas to make candy dishes inspired by saints. Fill bowls up with each of these candies and label them with the saint to which they correspond. It’s is a great way for kids and adults to learn more about saints while enjoying some delicious sweets too. St. Barbara, patron saint of lightning and fireworks - Pop Rocks St. Bernard, patron saint of mountaineers and skiers - Andes mints St. Corbinian, patron saint of bears - Gummy bears St. Florian, patron saint of fires and firefighters - Red Hots St. Francis, patron saint of animals - Frosted animal crackers St. Isidore, patron saint of farmers -Candy corn St. Nicholas, patron saint of children - Sour Patch Kids St. Perpetua, patron saint of cows -Cow Tails St. Peter, patron saint of fishermen - Swedish Fish St. Rupert, patron saint of salt miners -Salted caramel chocolates
 
Be a saint for Halloween
Teach children about different saints by having them dress up as one. Pick a saint based on the name of your church, child, family member or favorite saint. Research, read and learn more about the saint you’ve selected. Most saints can be depicted using traditional costumes with some added items that symbolize the saint. For instance, a princess costume could be St. Margaret, queen of Scotland or St.
Isabella, queen of Portugal; add and carry a cross to be St. Brigid, a Scottish princess; or St. Helena, mother of Constantine the Great.
 
Giving thanks
Give thanks to God before your Thanksgiving meal with this Thanksgiving Table Prayer. O Gracious God, we give you thanks for your overflowing generosity to us. Thank you for the blessings of the food we eat and especially for this feast today. Thank you for our home and family and friends, especially for the presence of those gathered here. Thank you for our health, our work and our play. Please send help to those who are hungry, alone, sick and suffering war and violence. Open our hearts to your love. We ask your blessing through Christ your son. Amen
--From “Celebrating Faith: Year-round Activities for Catholic Families,” by Mary Cronk Farrell
 
Back from the Dead Cemetery Walk Sunday, Oct. 29, 5 - 8 p.m. at St. John Vianney Parish, South Burlington. This evening is open to the whole family. “Back from the Dead Cemetery Walk” is an engaging and inspiring evangelization drama to help teach the Catholic faith about the “Last Things” including teachings on the Communion of Saints, the angels and the three great virtues: faith, hope and charity. For more information: backfromthedead.org.
 
--Originally published in the Fall 2017 Vermont Catholic magazine.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Published in Diocesan

Rice Memorial High School students provide families with Thanksgiving baskets

SOUTH BURLINGTON—Students and members of the Rice Memorial High School community helped 21 families have a happier Thanksgiving this year by providing them with baskets of food for a Thanksgiving meal.
 
They also engaged in a bit of competition with first place basket awarded to religion teacher Patrick Welsch’s class for a Snoopy "basket,” and second place going to History teacher Christian Frenette's class. Third place went to religion teacher Marti Burt's class.
 
Every first-period class was responsible for putting together the fixings for a Thanksgiving meal. Students are encouraged to be creative in their presentation and often go above and beyond what is asked.  
 
  • Published in Schools
Subscribe to this RSS feed
Bishop's Fund Annual Appeal