On October 16, 2016 there was be a Jubilee for the Sick at St. Joseph Co-Cathedral in Burlington. This Jubilee included a healing service for those with physical, emotional and spiritual concerns. Pilgrims heard testimony from those who are ill or experiencing illness in their families, had the opportunity to adore our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament, and received healing through the Sacraments of Anointing of the Sick and Confession. There was also opportunities to be prayed over by priests of the diocese, for those who did not wish to receive these sacraments. 

Year of Mercy: Jubilee for the Sick 

JUBILEE FOR THE SICK TO TAKE PLACE AT ST. JOSEPH CO-CATHEDRAL IN BURLINGTON

Vermont Catholic Online article by Cori Fugere Urban

BURLINGTON—“Everybody experiences a need for healing from physical, mental, spiritual, addictive, relational or financial problems,” said Father Lance Harlow. “It is a universal human struggle, and the mercy of God compels the Church to attend to those who struggle in the pursuit of physical, mental and spiritual integrity. God’s grace is manifested for everybody at a healing service because His mercy flows so abundantly.”
 
That grace will be available at a special Year of Mercy Jubilee for the Sick, a healing service, Sunday, Oct. 16, at 3 p.m. at St. Joseph Co-Cathedral, 20 Allen St., Burlington.
 
Each of the monthly celebrations for the Year of Mercy has featured an emphasis on Catholic life and the Church’s role in proclaiming the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the modern world. “The Church has always been involved with preaching, teaching and healing,” said Father Harlow, rector of Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception and St. Joseph Co-Cathedral parishes in Burlington and diocesan chair of the Ad Hoc Committee for the Year of Faith. “The means for healing are both sacramental and charismatic. The Jubilee for Healing on Oct. 16 at St. Joseph Co-Cathedral will offer both.”
 
There will be two sacramental healing “stations” for Catholics who are able to receive those sacraments, namely, the sacrament of the anointing of the sick and the sacrament of reconciliation. For those who are not Catholic, there will be “stations” for the biblical laying on of hands with prayers for healing.
 
Father Harlow has been involved with healing services for 23 years in parishes throughout the Diocese of Burlington and offers a monthly healing service in his parish. He has seen people healed through the sacraments and through the laying on of hands. “Praying for healing is one of the most beautiful aspects of the Church’s ministry of mercy deeply rooted in the Catholic Church’s biblical and traditional expression of the faith,” he said.
 
Father Harlow emphasizes that it is God who heals, not him. “Only God can heal you; I just pray,” he said, explaining that “the Lord heals them according to His will.”
           
Some people are healed spiritually, physically or emotionally as they have requested, while others may receive a different healing, perhaps unbeknownst to them. “People tell me they were healed all the time…but the feedback is just a fraction of the reality of the people who get healed,” Father Harlow said.
           
But God knows their needs, and everyone gets graces from the service, he added. “Graces take root by conversion. Part of any healing is conversion, to grow in holiness and the perfection of ones’ vocation.”
           
Therefore, one cannot pray for a marriage to be healed without working on the marital relationship, for example.
           
“The sacrament of confession is the most beautiful and most important part of a healing service,” Father Harlow said. Physical healings would last only in this lifetime, and persons still die. But with spiritual healing, there are graces for the salvation of souls.
 
Joseph F. Myers of Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Williston estimated that he has been prayed over more than 40 times. “I have had a physical healing of the low back while Father Harlow was praying over me,” he reported. “I have had an increase in my Catholic faith and trust in God. I have also been prayed over for many family, friends and co-workers fighting health issues. Some are cancer survivors and some have made a full recovery from major illnesses and surgeries.”
 
He suggested that if people have any reservations about going to a healing service, they should go and sit in a pew and pray silently. “They can choose to be prayed over if and when they are ready,” he said.
 
The focus of the healing service on Oct. 16 will be on the adoration of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. “The healing ‘stations’ will revolve around Jesus as the central axis since all healing comes from him,” Father Harlow said. “Therefore, the whole diocese is invited to come and pray for the sick during this holy hour. Those who want to be prayed over for specific issues will be conducted to the correct ‘station.’”

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