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St.Therese Digital Academy enrollment increases

Enrollment at the Diocese of Burlington’s St. Therese Digital Academy has grown from four to 52.
 
Principal Lisa Lorenz attributes the growth to several factors including grant money from Our Sunday Visitor and the Catholic Communications Campaign of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, word of mouth, courses for the Lay Formation Program Institute for Missionary Discipleship, the building of the digital academy’s own curriculum and existing brick and mortar schools using its courses.
 
St. Therese Digital Academy is an online diocesan Catholic high school with a rigorous program grounded in the firm foundation of the Catholic faith. The academy works with parents in their role as the primary educators of their children by providing flexible options to assist with the diverse educational needs of students and their families. Its goal is to develop well-grounded disciples of Jesus Christ who possess 21st-century skills, equipping them to fulfill their roles as members of the Body of Christ within society.
 
The digital academy offers high school courses and theology for the Lay Formation Program, with projections for catechetical classes for ongoing professional development.
 
“We are rolling out our own courses. We are beginning our adult theology classes and have projected to roll out courses for the Diocesan Lay Formation Program as part of the Institute for Missionary Discipleship. In addition, our courses are being used in our existing [Catholic] schools now with increasing interest,” said Lorenz, who is also superintendent of Catholic schools for the Diocese of Burlington and principal of Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington.
  • Published in Diocesan

A New Year

Responding to editors' requests for a regular sampling of current commentary from around the Catholic press, Catholic News Service provided an unsigned editorial titled "A new year" from Our Sunday Visitor, a national Catholic newsweekly based in Huntington, Ind.
 
By the grace of God, Catholics can obtain a "fresh start" in the Christian life every time we freely participate in the sacrament of reconciliation. As we flip the calendar to a new year, we have a different kind of opportunity before us -- one that challenges us to look at how we will spend the empty days, weeks and months facing us in 2017. Will we live the Christian life to our fullest potential?
 
Here are five ways to begin:
 
+ Be a Christian witness. The United States just completed one its most contentious elections in history. The country is divided by race, class and even within individual families, and, at times, it seems everyone has forgotten what it means to participate in civil dialogue. As Christians, we have the ability -- indeed the obligation -- to offer a different path. Instead of contributing to the fighting, we can demonstrate what Pope Francis means when he asks us to encounter one another with respect and love. When we look at our fellow human beings as those who have dignity rather than treat them with rancor, we give witness to what Jesus meant when he said, "As I have loved you, so you also should love one another" (Jn 13:34).
 
+ Carry on the message of mercy. The Year of Mercy may have ended in November, but the message of mercy carries on. If you developed a habit of living out the corporal and spiritual works of mercy in 2016, don't abandon them because the "year" has reached its end. If you never got into the habit, it's never too late to begin. Living and acting mercifully in our daily lives means witnessing perpetually to the Father's love on earth.
 
+ Give of yourself. What better way to start the new year and continue the Christmas season than by thinking of others? Men, women and children in Syria, in particular, are in need of both great financial assistance as well as many prayers. So, too, are Christians in the Middle East. Both of these populations can be assisted through organizations such as Aid to the Church in Need, Catholic Relief Services or Catholic Near East Welfare Association. Many opportunities for involvement and assistance exist closer to home, too, and it's never too early to teach young children or grandchildren the importance of generosity and selflessness.
 
+ Participate in formation. Our Catholic faith is a treasure, and one of its great gifts is that there is always more to learn. The start of a new year can be an opportune time to recommit to learning more about the faith.
 
+ Rediscover the rosary. This year we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the apparitions of Our Lady to three shepherd children in Fatima, Portugal. Mary had much to say to us, but one of her primary messages was for us to pray the rosary every day for peace. If we are not heeding her direction perhaps as often as we should, this anniversary year affords us the perfect opportunity to once again take her words to heart. If praying once a day is too much at first, work up to it by beginning once a week and then extending the practice as it becomes more habitual.
 
  • Published in Nation
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