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Society of St. Edmund opens anniversary celebration

The Gospel story about the apostles in a boat on a stormy Sea of Galilee is essentially the story of a French religious order’s early decades after its founding 175 years ago – or, for that matter, of those founders’ spiritual heirs at a Vermont Catholic college in 2017, suggested the homilist for a historically significant Holy Day celebration at St. Anne’s Shrine in Isle LaMotte Aug. 15.
 
“Men of great faith invited by Jesus to come across turbulent waters” is how Edmundite Father Stephen Hornat, the Society of St. Edmund’s superior general, put it during the well-attended, late-morning Feast of the Assumption Mass at the shrine.
 
The liturgy officially began a year of events to note the 175th anniversary of the Edmundites’ 1843 founding at a humble and ruined former Cistercian Abbey in Pontigny, France, by Fathers Jean Baptiste Muard and Pierre Boyer, French diocesan priests who, as Fathr Hornat described, dedicated their lives to evangelism, the caretaking of holy shrines and, most significantly on this Marian Feast, to the intercessory protection and aid of Mary, the Mother of Jesus.
 
A parishioner at Winooski’s St. Stephen Church had asked him why not have the Mass at the Edmundite-founded St. Michael’s College rather than the Edmundite-administered shrine, Father Hornat said in his homily. “When I thought about it, the longest running ministry that Edmundites had during our 175-year history, wasn’t education, wasn’t retreat work, wasn’t administering parishes, but rather, caretakers of shrines (including Mont St. Michel in France and St. Anne’s in Vermont).”
 
Yet all those vital pieces of the Edmundites’ history and present mission were represented at the Mass. Most of the St. Michael’s College-based Edmundite community concelebrated, numbering a dozen or more priests and brothers, including those who administer nearby parishes. Present also were many current and former administrators of St. Michael’s College and other faculty, staff and alumni.
 
Father Hornat’s homily shed light on the order’s name and mission from its history: How St. Edmund is buried over the main altar at Pontigny Abbey where Fathers Muard and Boyer first gathered; that originally, the Edmundites were called the Oblates of the Sacred Heart; that Pontigny Abbey happened to be named in honor of St. Mary of the Assumption, “by coincidence or divine intervention,” making the day’s feast most significant to the group; or that the group didn’t become officially recognized as a Church religious order (rather than just a diocesan group) until 1876, and they didn’t become “Fathers of St. Edmund” until 1907.
 
Another guest for the day was a scholar of the history and legacy of St. Edmund who also is Anglican chaplain of St. Edmund Hall, Oxford – Rev. Will Donaldson, who at a reception and light lunch following Mass said he is traveling to sites related to the 12th/13th-century namesake of the place where he is chaplain.
 
As to his interest in Edmund given his present position, he said, “I was thinking I need to find out about him … and the more I look, the more I like it … I want to find out everything I can about him; so I’m over here in Vermont really to chat to people, meet the Edmundites, and particularly ask the question, ‘What is it about the life of St. Edmund that continues to inspire you today?’”
 
He said he and his wife are touring North America as part of research for what he expects to be about a 10,000-word short book on Edmund in three sections: first, a brief historical survey of Edmund’s life and ministry; second, a look at his character through the lens of the Beatitudes, “because I think he hits the Beatitudes on every point – the poor in spirit, those who mourn, the pure in heart, those who are persecuted, these kinds of things are his characteristics;” – and third, a look at how St. Edmund continues to influence Christian communities today, including in Vermont.
 
Other events relating to the Edmundite 175th anniversary in the coming year will include:
 
Nov. 15: St. Edmund’s Lecture and Reception at St. Michael's College.
Nov. 16: Mass at the Chapel of St. Michael the Archangel, St. Michael's College (Feast of St. Edmund).
May 13-21, 2018: Heritage Trip to France, led by Edmundite Father Marcel Rainville.
July 3, 2018: Celebration marking Fathers Muard and Bravard moving into the Cistercian Abbey in Pontigny. Mass and picnic at Holy Family Church, Essex Junction.
Aug. 15, 2018: Closing of the Anniversary Year; Mass and reception at St. Anne’s Shrine in Isle LaMotte.
 

Essex Catholic Community’s Vacation Bible School

Imagine going back in time to the ancient city of Ephesus in what is now Turkey where Mary, the Mother of Jesus, is believed to have lived, to learn about her life and mission. 
 
This was the journey taken by 60 youngsters who recently attended the Essex Catholic Community’s Vacation Bible School focused on the holy woman, Mary, the Mother of God. 
 
Each day of the program introduced kindergarten through fifth-graders to themes like “Mary served others” or “Mary said ‘yes’ to God” as well as to some of the modern appearances or apparitions of Mary in Fatima, Spain; Lourdes, France; and Banneux, Belgium. 
 
“I hope the children have learned that Mary was the first and most courageous of Jesus’ disciples,” said John McMahon, faith formation director at Holy Family-St. Lawrence Parish and vacation Bible school creator. “What made her so special was her total faith and trust in God and that she always leads us to Jesus.”
 
The week-long camp, a collaboration between Holy Family–St. Lawrence and St. Pius X parishes, concluded with a sacred Mary Procession, followed by a traditional water balloon fight.
 
The equal mix of fun and substantive learning about an aspect of the Christian faith follows a hands-on model of learning where youngsters, for example, can create icons and rosaries while contemplating what Mary’s “thy will be done” means in their own lives. 
 
A team of 35 volunteers, from former campers to retired parishioners, guide participants in the catechesis or direct craft activities, such as making rose-filled mantles like the one impressed with Mary’s image at Guadalupe, Mexico.
 
“This program tries to model active discipleship,” said McMahon, who has directed the 15-year effort.  “Our entire staff grows together in faith alongside the children they are serving. The volunteers are wonderful role models; and the youngsters witness the teens and adults practicing their own faith.”
 
Other themes through the years have included Jesus’ early years of ministry, Holy Week leading up to Jesus’ death and resurrection and Catholic saints through the centuries. The program aims to give the youngest Catholics access to the history, vocabulary and spiritual learning of the holy men and women who walked and witnessed before them.


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By Marybeth Christie Redmond


 

Saying 'yes' to God

By Deacon Phil Lawson

She said “Yes!”
 
Some 13 years ago, I got down on one knee in the adoration chapel and asked Patty to marry me.
 
After a short pause, (during which the mind tends to operate very quickly!) she said “yes.” My heart soared at that one word response.
 
Some 2,000 years ago, the Angel Gabriel approached Mary and asked her to be the Mother of God. At her “yes,” all of heaven rejoiced. In the years since, our Lord has continued to ask for our “yes” to His call or even his proposal to be part of His life and to be His instruments in this world.
 
This year we mark the 100th anniversary of Mary’s appearance to the three shepherd children in Fatima. And when she appeared, for what did she ask? For their “yes” to being part of God’s plan.  “Are you willing to offer yourselves to God and bear all the sufferings He wills to send you as an act of reparation for the conversion of sinners?” To which they said, “Yes.” And no doubt Our Lady smiled. For these precious three children, had echoed her own “yes” so many years before.
 
Being a person of faith, at its root, is simply about saying “yes” to the Lord, which is exactly what Mary and the three shepherd children did. It’s that simple; it’s that difficult! We said “yes” to the Lord at our Baptism, at our First Holy Communion, at our Confirmation. We say “yes” to the Lord every time we go to Mass. And we say “yes” to the Lord, every time we listen to the promptings of the Holy Spirit and act in accord with the Lord’s will.
 
Pope Francis, commenting on Mary’s “yes,” stated: “Every yes to God creates stories of salvation for us and for others…. God desires to see us and awaits our “yes” (Dec. 8, 2016).
 
What does this look like in terms of evangelization? We say “yes” when the Lord allows us to enter into someone’s life. We say “yes” when we are invited to pray with and for someone. We say “yes” when someone encounters Christ in us. We say “yes” when the Lord allows us to share the joy and beauty of our faith with another (1 Pt 3:15). We say “yes” when we willingly witness the importance of faith in our lives. We say “yes” whenever someone sees the joy of the Gospel in our life and thereby, as Pope Francis shares, create stories of salvation for countless others, as both Mary and the children of Fatima did in their own lives. All of these “yeses” are forms of “evangelization.”
 
There was exultation in heaven when Mary said “yes,” exultation when the children at Fatima said “yes.” And there will be exultation in Heaven as well each time we say “yes” to the Lord’s will.
 
As a final note: The name of the church where I proposed to my wife? St. Mary.
 
Deacon Phil Lawson is the executive director of evangelization, catechesis, divine worship, marriage and family and respect life for the Diocese of Burlington. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Originally published in the Summer 2017 issue of 
Vermont Catholic magazine.
 

Becoming fully alive: vocational discernment

By Father Jon Schnobrich

What is vocational discernment? Vocation comes from the Latin word, “vocare,” which means, “to call.” God calls each one of us by name to become saints, thereby the first vocation in our lives is the universal call to holiness: “Be perfect as your heavenly father is perfect” (Mt 5:48).
 
How do perfection and holiness relate to each other?
 
Let’s understand what our Lord means by “perfect” as that word today is so unfortunately misunderstood. Being perfect is not perfectionism. This call to be perfect comes as the climax in our Lord’s teaching on Christian love:
 
“You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, love your enemies, and pray for those who persecute you that you may be children of your heavenly Father, for He makes His sun rise on the bad and the good and causes rain to fall on the just and the unjust. For if you love those who love you, what recompense will you have? Do not the tax collectors do the same? And if you greet your brothers only, what is unusual about that? Do not the pagans do the same? So be perfect, just as your heavenly Father is perfect (Mt 5:43-48).”
 
Jesus points to the Father’s love, which is without calculation or condition. The Father loves in truth with mercy. He loves sinners and saints alike. To freely conform one’s life, one’s inner attitudes and one’s way of thinking so as to love unconditionally and mercifully is the holiness of life to which our Lord calls all of His disciples without distinction.
 
However, to love like this means to love in the way that God reveals. God is love, which means that we as creatures look to our creator to define love. To love as God loves, as St. Thomas Aquinas explains, is to will the good of the other for the other; to desire another to flourish in their being. The perfection to which Jesus calls us relates to holiness of life precisely in love. Love conforms itself to its object; thereby the more we love God who is love, the more we become like God who is love.
 
To put it simply: If God is LOVE, the more we love LOVE, the more we are able to love as LOVE loves.
 
The universal call to holiness is the call from Christ through His Church to become fully who God intended us to be. In the words of St. Irenaeus of Lyon, “The glory of God is the human being fully alive.” Because Christ is holy, we, His body, are called to strive each day for the sanctification of our lives, the integration of all that we are into all that Christ is: “Each in his own state of life, tend to the perfection of love, thus helping others grow in holiness” (Lumen Gentium, 5, 39).
 
Every disciple is called to perfect love, to love the way the Father loves.
 
Father Schnobrich is vocations director of the Diocese of Burlington.
 
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