Log in
    

Bishop to convene diocesan synod

Burlington Bishop Christopher J. Coyne has announced plans to convene the first diocesan synod in Vermont since 1962.

Its purpose is to establish a pastoral plan for the immediate future of the Catholic Church in Vermont and to establish particular laws and policies to do so. This will be at least a yearlong project and is “a serious undertaking by the Church,” he said. “It is not a simple convening of meetings.”

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington serves a population of 118,000 Catholics.

There are 65 active priests (45 diocesan and 20 religious order or ex tern) and 43 permanent deacons ministering in 73 parishes and 23 missions. The diocese includes 14 Catholic schools (including St. Therese Digital Academy) and a catechetical system with an estimated 4,700 students. Through Vermont Catholic Charities’ social services and homes for the aged, the Diocese of Burlington assisted more than 6,000 Vermonters last year.

The bishop will serve as the convener and presider of the synod, and membership will contain both ex-officio members of the clergy and laity as well as representatives of religious communities, lay fraternities and at-large representation such as young people, parents and minority communities.

Before the sessions of the synod are convened – the bishop hopes that will be next spring -- all of the members of the Catholic community will be invited to participate in a preparation process in which they will be asked to pray, to listen, to learn and to discern what the future pastoral plan for spreading the “good news” of the Church in Vermont should be. This will take place on the parish level, the deanery (regional) level and the diocesan level. It will include personal meetings but could also make use of new digital and social media means of communication.

After this work of preparation is completed, the bishop will convene the synod to meet in the necessary sessions to complete the work of discernment and planning and to then enact the policies, laws and directives to carry out that plan in the Vermont Church. “I will seek input from all. I will listen to all. And I will discern with you all,” he said.
 

Composting at diocesan headquarters

Employees of the Diocese of Burlington have been pitching in to reduce the amount of trash sent to Vermont’s only landfill by recycling, and now staff at the Joy Drive diocesan headquarters in South Burlington is separating compostables from trash there.
 
Instead of putting apple cores, banana peels, pizza crusts and other food waste into the trash, it all goes into compost barrels that will be picked up and used for compost. Used paper towels, paper napkins and uncoated paper cups and plates are also dropped into composting receptacles.
 
The beefed up trash reduction effort began in January in the building that houses the chancery and such offices as those for evangelization and catechesis, safe environments, worship, communications, human resources, vocations and youth and young adult ministry.
 
In “Laudato Si’,” Pope Francis quotes St. John Paul II’s “Centesimus Annus,” saying, "Every effort to protect and improve our world entails profound changes in 'lifestyles, models of production and consumption, and the established structures of power which today govern societies.'"
 
“Learning about waste reduction and putting what we learn into practice here at 55 Joy Drive is one small way to put effort into these changes,” said Stephanie Clary, mission outreach and communication coordinator for the Diocese of Burlington. “Managing materials in this way is how we best cooperate with natural processes of decomposition and regeneration and, therefore, respect patterns inscribed in creation by the Creator—it is a miraculous design!”
 
Before the effort began, Michele Morris, assistant waste reduction manager and business outreach coordinator for Chittenden Solid Waste District in Williston, gave a presentation to employees about reducing, reusing and recycling, with a special emphasis on separating items from the trash that can be composted.
 
The diocese is partnering with the solid waste district to reduce, reuse and recycle during the Year of Creation called for by Burlington Bishop Christopher Coyne.
 
“The best way to start is education,” said Steve Ticehurst, director of maintenance at the Joy Drive office building. “What can we do to help reduce our [carbon] footprint and green up our building and save our planet?”
 
Morris had some answers.
 
Sending trash to the Coventry landfill is costly – not just to put it there but to truck it there. For example, more than 48,000 gallons of diesel fuel are used a year taking trash there from Chittenden County.
 
She suggested that reducing trash begins with reducing acquiring. “Identify needs versus wants,” she said.
 
Other ways of reducing the amount of things brought into the home include buying in bulk and repackaging and instead of buying items for gifts, give gifts of time, experiences and connections.
 
Reuse options are limitless, Morris said. All it takes is some creativity to make a trivet out of wine corks or tote bags out of plastic grocery bags.
 
In discussing recycling, she said it is important to know what can and cannot be recycled and to ensure what is recycled is clean.
 
Her presentation emphasized the importance of getting food scraps out of trash by having better strategies for purchasing and storing food so it is not wasted and by donating excess food to people in need. Some food can be given to farmers for animal feed.
 
Food that gets into the landfill creates harmful methane gas and leachate -- water that has percolated through a solid and leached out some of the constituents.
 
Removing food from trash can save money. For example, Morris noted that fees facilities charge to dump trash are about $129 per ton while it costs $45 a ton for food scraps and $21 a ton for recycling. “When you look at the comparison, there’s no comparison,” she said.
 
Ticehurst said he would be collecting information on cost savings for the diocese as the trash reduction program gets underway.
 
In addition, staff at other diocesan buildings are learning about/preparing to better manage the disposal of their materials.
 
“We have been encouraged by so many of the wonderful initiatives, organizations and people in Vermont who are committed to living sustainably,” Clary said. “Our hope is to join and support those efforts as we learn about and begin practicing specific, attainable strategies to care for our common home and all those with which it is shared.”
 
“There is a nobility in the duty to care for creation through little daily actions, and it is wonderful how education can bring about real changes in lifestyle. Education in environmental responsibility can encourage ways of acting which directly and significantly affect the world around us,” Pope Francis said in his encyclical. These efforts “reflect a generous and worthy creativity which brings out the best in human beings. Reusing something instead of immediately discarding it, when done for the right reasons, can be an act of love which expresses our own dignity.”

Originally published in the 2017 spring issue of Vermont Catholic magazine.
 
 

Lenten confirmation program

Parishes throughout the Diocese of Burlington have been invited to participate in a Lenten program to prepare adults to receive the sacrament of confirmation at Pentecost.
 
Burlington Bishop Christopher Coyne confirms adults at Pentecost at St. Joseph Co-Cathedral in Burlington. “Offering this program through Lent and the Easter Season allows those adults [18 and older] who are seeking confirmation to be adequately prepared to receive the graces of the sacrament both intellectually and spiritually,” explained Deacon Phil Lawson, director of evangelization and catechesis for the diocese. “Journeying with the community through Lent and Easter is a wonderful opportunity to grow closer to Christ and prepare to receive the Gifts of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost.”
 
Confirmation is one of the Sacraments of Initiation, the initial sacraments by which persons become members of the Catholic Church: baptism, confirmation and Eucharist. Through these sacraments, one is first welcomed into the Catholic community, nourished by the body and blood of the Lord and strengthened through intensification of the presence of the Holy Spirit.
 
Leaders for the confirmation program vary; in some parishes the director of religious education teaches the participants, in others it is a parish priest or volunteer catechist.
 
Deacon Lawson provided a workshop and online training for the parish leaders.
 
Paul Turnley is co-facilitating the program with RoseMaria Doran, for Our Lady of Seven Dolors Church in Fair Haven, St. John the Baptist Church in Castleton, St. Paul Church in Orwell, St. Matthew of Avalon Church at Lake Bomoseen, St. Frances Cabrini Church in West Pawlet, St. Raphael Church in Poultney and St. Anne Church in Middletown Springs.
 
Their program will include seven two-hour sessions: Each will use the framework of prayer, discipleship and mission to present its theme using as resources “The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults,” “Catechism of the Catholic Church” and the Bible.
 
Topics include “Desire for God,” “The Holy Spirit,” “Prayer. Challenge of following Christ. Moral Life. Mary and the Communion of Saints” and “Discipleship.”
 
“The Adult Confirmation Program is built around the framework of Encounter, Accompany, and Mission,” Turnley explained. “The first four and a half sessions, which include the three sessions during Lent, are focused on ‘Encountering Christ’ through focusing on our desire for God; the Holy Spirit; the sacraments of confirmation, reconciliation and the Eucharist; and prayer. These are preparation for accompanying the participants as they accept the challenge of following Christ, responding in love and giving their whole selves and lives to Him….”
 
Pope Francis has called for the Church to be “a facilitator of grace,” and providing an opportunity for adults who haven’t been confirmed to receive the Gifts of the Holy Spirit in confirmation “certainly fits the bill,” Deacon Lawson said.
 
Evangelization is about going out and sharing the joy of the Gospel, so the Lenten program “is a tremendous opportunity to reach out to those who may have drifted away from their faith,” he said.
 
The foundation of this process is a type of mini-catechumenate. Participants encounter Christ -- especially in the Gospels -- the leaders journey with them, and then the participants are equipped and sent forward on mission to live a life of faith.
 
Edmundite Father David Cray, pastor of St. Jude Church in Hinesburg and Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Charlotte, likes the idea of a “uniform…flexible and convenient” process throughout the diocese to prepare adults for confirmation. Offering it during Lent has the benefit of proximity to the Pentecost confirmation by the bishop.
 
However, offering the program during Lent is what is suggested but not required.
 
Turnley said the program combines the elements of re-enkindling love, devotion and commitment to Jesus as the Christ through prayer, the sacraments and a willingness to be Christ in the world “with the opportunity of refreshing our understanding of our faith and our beliefs.”
 
The process in the diocese will be ongoing and offered annually as well as on an as-needed basis.  

--------------------
Originally published in the 2017 spring issue of Vermont Catholic Magazine.
 

Immaculate Conception Chapel

For Stephen E. Ticehurst, director of maintenance working in the Facilities and Insurance Department at the headquarters of the Diocese of Burlington in South Burlington, one of the happiest times of his life was transforming a room in the office building into a chapel. “I was just honored to be part of bringing a space to our employees where they could sit, reflect and be closer to God,” he said.
           
Employees had attended weekday Mass in a chapel at the former diocesan headquarters, The Bishop Brady Center on North Avenue in Burlington, before it was sold to Burlington College in 2010.
           
The Immaculate Conception Chapel at the current diocesan office building at 55 Joy Drive, is adorned with 11 windows: Two came from the St. Peter’s Chapel salvaged from the old Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception that burned; nine are from Holy Trinity Church in Danby.
           
“The larger windows are what is called museum-style glass, and the two smaller windows are traditional leaded stained glass,” Ticehurst explained.
           
The windows bear various symbols including the Sacred Heart of Jesus and a Christogram -- a symbol for Christ, consisting of the Greek letters chi (Χ) and rho (Ρ).
           
Ticehurst installed the windows between September and December 2014.
He restored broken glass and cleaned, repaired and repainted the frames. He built custom frames to fit the existing windows and custom milled and stained the woodwork to match the rest of the chapel.
           
“By installing the windows, there are no ‘outside’ distractions of the world,” Ticehurst said. “It brings you to a place of calm and peace, a chance to stop and be one with our Lord Jesus, to sit and reflect in a welcoming space.”
           
The windows make the room darker “so you naturally have a sense to whisper, to breath, to stop and take time to talk to God,” he continued. “As I built the chapel, it became more and more like a chapel: darker, more peaceful, less of an office space more like God’s space.”
           
Christina Holmes, accounts payables/accounts receivables manager for the Diocese of Burlington, tries to attend Mass in the chapel at less twice a week. “I think that it is wonderful to have Mass at the workplace because when I was growing up I never went to Mass during the week only if it was a holy day,” she said. “Also it is wonderful because if you need some quiet time to just go and pray during the day you can go in to the chapel anytime to do that.”
           
Confessions are heard in the chapel, and the diocese’s televised Mass is taped there.
           
Daily Mass is celebrated in the chapel on most workdays at noon, and the public is welcome to attend.
 
 
  • Published in Diocesan

Care regardless of ability to pay

Vermont Catholic Charities Inc. provides quality care in its four eldercare residences regardless of a resident’s ability to pay.
 
In 2015, 77 percent of the residents received Medicaid.
 
“Our mission is to provide residents with a safe, caring and homelike environment where they can enjoy a pleasant living experience rooted in Christian dignity,” said Mary Beth Pinard, executive director of Vermont Catholic Charities. “For private pay residents, if they convert to Medicaid, they can stay with us and in their same room.  This isn’t the case every facility. Some facilities require residents to move once they have moved from private pay to Medicaid.”
 
Michaud Memorial Manor in Derby Line has 33 beds; Loretto Home and St. Joseph Kervick Residence in Rutland have a total of 107 beds including Loretto Home’s special care unit for residents assessed with higher physical and/or cognitive limitations. St. Joseph’s Residential Care Home in Burlington has 41 beds.
 
The Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington provides rent-free use the four residential care homes totaling $1.35 million annually because “our social mission is to care for the sick, the poor, the elderly regardless of their ability to pay,” pointed out Burlington Bishop Christopher Coyne. “As Catholics, we are all called to put our faith into action and follow in the footsteps of Jesus.”
 
According to Jeanne Schmelzenbach, administrator of Loretto Home and St. Joseph Kervick Residence, 83 percent of the residents cannot afford the private pay rate and are subsidized by Catholic Charities. “This number has been increasing steadily over the past several years.” It was about 75 percent in 2014.
 
“We pride ourselves on providing exceptional resident care to all residents regardless of their ability to pay,” said Mary Belanger, administrator of St. Joseph’s Residential Care Home. “All our residents are provided the care and services that they need to thrive.”
 
The homes’ commitment to the dignity of all people comes from the Gospel, Catholic Charities and founders of the homes.
 
“Our commitment comes from the belief that we as a Catholic institution, give back to the residents in need with an open heart,” Belanger added.
 
“Our goal is to provide a homelike environment where everyone can enjoy a pleasant living experience and receive the assistance they need,” Schmelzenbach said.
 
The residential care homes provide personal care, general supervision, medication management and nursing overview to persons unable to live wholly independently but are not in need of the level of care provided in nursing homes.
 
According to Anne Steinberg, administrator of Michaud Memorial Manor, because of Vermont Catholic Charities dedication to serving those in need, the home is fortunate to be able to care for an unusually high number of Medicaid recipients – about 70 percent at Michaud. “The rate of reimbursement that Medicaid provides is relatively low, making it pretty cost prohibitive for most homes to accept a large percentage of Medicaid residents,” she said. “I feel very blessed to work for an organization that recognizes the importance of opening our doors to all those in need, regardless of payer source.”
 
“The Medicaid reimbursement helps us care for residents with higher care needs without needing to transfer them to a nursing home,” Belanger said, adding that the reimbursement helps but it is not enough to care for all the people in need in the community.
 
The Catholic Charities-run homes are fully licensed by the Vermont Division of Licensing and Protection as Level III Residential Care Homes. 
 
Medicaid provides about one third of the actual cost of caring for a resident.
 
“Catholic Charities and fiscal management of the homes enable us to support this underserved segment of our population,” Schmelzenbach said.
 

Father Luke Austin's call to priesthood

“I was interested in some form of government service, but as God methodically drew me to my vocation, He was calling me to another form of service and another way to love,” said Father Luke Austin.
 
The pastor of Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary-St. Louis Parish in Swanton and Highgate Center said it was a challenge ending an approximate 2-year relationship, but he did not miss the law when he decided to enter the seminary. “There was, at the same time, a growing feeling of freedom to make such a decision.”
 
Asked to share his vocation story with Vermont Catholic readers, Father Austin offered his thoughts not only on his own vocation but ways to encourage men toward the priestly life.
 
His parents, Pauline and the late Dr. David Austin Sr., were raised in Vermont and attended Catholic schools; they met in Burlington.
 
When Father Austin was in kindergarten, he would “play priest,” and his grandmother’s housekeeper sewed him some “vestments.”
 
“But the funny thing is that I never considered it as something I would be when I grew up,” he said.
 
He attended Christ the King School and Mount St. Joseph Academy in Rutland, graduating in 1994; he treasures his Catholic school experience. He graduated from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., in 1998, majoring in government and obtained a law degree from George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C., in 2002.
 
It wasn’t until the end of law school that he first considered the priesthood as a real possibility. “The [clergy sex abuse] scandals had broken in Boston, and I was thinking about all the good priests and nuns who had a cloud of suspicion because of all the uncertainty,” he said.
 
He spoke with his university chaplain, who then became the vocations director for the Archdiocese of Washington, and he encouraged the young man to stay in touch as he entered to workforce.
 
Before entering the seminary, Father Austin worked as a legislative correspondent for the Senate Judiciary Committee and had various summer clerkships in at prosecutor’s offices in the Washington area. He worked as an attorney on contract basis for the Department of the Interior.
 
The Washington vocation director encouraged him to become more involved in his parish, attend vocations events and see a spiritual director. “After peppering my spiritual director was all sorts of questions and running out of them, he said to me: ‘so what are you waiting for?’ At that point, I knew I had to speak to someone back in Vermont, just to make sure God wasn’t calling me there,” Father Austin continued. “But after speaking with a number of Vermont priests, I felt the sense of community and greater need in Vermont, and through that, my call to diocesan priesthood here. I am grateful God called me back home!”
 
He had no one role model, but talking to a number of priests played a role in his discernment to first enter seminary. He contends “the call” is best described as “living out God’s specific grace given to us at baptism, lived out in a certain time and place.”
 
After attending Mount St. Mary’s Seminary in Emmitsburg, Md., he attended North American College in Rome and studied canon law at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome.
 
Ordained in 2010, Father Austin has served churches in Manchester Center, Arlington, St. Johnsbury, Lyndonville and Danville.
 
Father Austin, who enjoys reading and skiing, is now judicial vicar for the Diocese of Burlington.
 
He advises men considering the priesthood to speak to their parish priest. “You need to talk to someone about it, because chances are, the questions you have are the same that your parish priest had,” he said.
 
He tries to encourage vocations to all callings, not just priesthood. “I ask my confirmation students if they have asked God what His plan is for their lives,” he said.
 
He also planned a Chalice Prayer Program in which each week a family takes a chalice home as a centerpiece for daily prayer for different vocations.
 
“As much as government service or a wife and children would be a beautiful thing, I know my family is the Church,” Father Austin said.
 
 
  • Published in Diocesan

St. Therese Digital Academy grants

The Diocese of Burlington’s St. Therese Digital Academy, an online Catholic high school with a rigorous program grounded in the Catholic faith, has received two grants totaling $116,000 to support the development of a digital learning platform, curriculum and marketing.
 
The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Catholic Communications Campaign awarded $96,000 and Our Sunday Visitor awarded $20,000 to provide access to a Catholic education to families limited by geography and for Catholic formation courses and catechism education for children and adults.
 
"This support will provide us with the resources necessary to develop Catholic formation courses for Catholics young and old who desire to continue to grow in their knowledge of our Catholic faith beyond the traditional means. Faith formation is no longer hindered by conflicting work, school or extra-curricular schedules," said Burlington Bishop Christopher J. Coyne. "We want to reach out to people and provide as many options as possible to grow in their faith; to do so we must embrace technology."
 
The academy works with parents in their roles as primary educators by offering an online Catholic high school with flexible options to assist in their child’s education while also providing weekly local opportunities for enrichment courses, community service projects and social and spiritual formation.
 
“This format of a Catholic high school overcomes the obstacles of no Catholic school nearby. We are serving military families whose children would otherwise not be able to have access to a Catholic education such as Okinawa, Japan,” said Lisa Lorenz, superintendent of Catholic schools for the Diocese of Burlington and principal of the digital academy. 
 
The school’s goal is to develop well-grounded disciples of Jesus Christ who possess 21st-Century skills that equip them to fulfill their roles as members of the Body of Christ within today’s society.
 
This spring plans call for offering classes to students at Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington who need specific classes to meet their requirements or are in need of advanced classes.
 
“We will be offering to our smaller high schools that cannot afford to have a large variety of courses this online format as a supplement to the rigors of their already in-person classes,” Lorenz said, referring to Mount St. Joseph Academy in Rutland and St. Michael High School in Brattleboro. “We even have students taking classes merely for enrichment. Our hopes are that we can also aid those families who may not be able to send their children to Catholic schools but really would like to have their child continue growing in the faith by studying theology classes.”
 
In addition, there will be adult theology classes for ongoing catechesis. “All of this can and will be built with the funding made possible by Our Sunday Visitor and the USCCB,” Lorenz said.
 
She has been speaking at parishes about the digital academy and has found it is met with enthusiasm, support and a sense of hope for Catholic education being restored in their communities in a 21st-Century model.
 
“Without the funds this endeavor would be impossible,” Lorenz said. “It will permit Catholic education to reach beyond brick and mortar, as well as being able to offer a more affordable Catholic high school.”
 
St. Therese Digital Academy currently enrolls five students.
 
There are three other Catholic high schools in the Diocese of Burlington: Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington, Mount St. Joseph Academy in Rutland and St. Michael High School in Brattleboro.
 
For more information about the digital academy, go to stdavt.org.
 
 
  • Published in Schools

2017: "Year of Creation"

Diocese to observe 2017 as "Year of Creation"

Similar to the global Year of Mercy announced by Pope Francis last year which entertained a heightened focus on the role of mercy in the Catholic faith, the diocesan wide Year of Creation will entertain an intentional, heightened focus on ecological justice. Various events, initiatives and resources will be made available to parishes and Catholic schools to better educate on and encourage the embracing of Pope Francis’ message in his 2015 encyclical, “Laudato Si’: On Care for Our Common Home.”
 
This is the second encyclical of Pope Francis. It is addressed to "every person living on this planet" for an inclusive dialogue about how people are shaping the future of the created world. He calls everyone to acknowledge the urgency of pursuing ecological justice and to join him in embarking on a new path based in integral ecology.
 
Burlington Bishop Christopher Coyne invites all Catholics to join with him in celebrating this “Year of Creation” in the diocese.
 
He noted the pope’s emphasis that concern for the created world is not optional, but an integral part of Church teaching on social justice. “While it has been nearly two years since its publication, I think it is time for the Church here in Vermont to study, ponder and begin to implement much of what the pope calls for” in the document, the bishop said.
 
The diocese also has formed a partnership with Commons Energy that allows for low-cost energy efficiency audits and energy efficiency/renewable energy projects on many church-owned buildings throughout the state. Within the first two months of the year, fifteen buildings have requested to begin the energy efficiency audit process.
 
Additionally, one of the first steps the Diocese of Burlington has taken at 55 Joy Drive in South Burlington, the diocesan headquarters, to counteract a "throwaway culture" and set an example of ecologically responsible practices is to adopt the practice of composting—a simple way to support circular models of production and consumption.
 
“Vermont’s 118,000 Catholics can make a sustainable impact on the state of the created world and its creatures. Furthermore, if the Diocese of Burlington’s Year of Creation is successful in raising awareness of and action toward ecological justice, it can serve as an encouraging example for other Catholic dioceses and communities of faith throughout the country and the globe. There are an estimated 1.2 billion Catholics on Earth—just think of what could be achieved if we committed to caring for the created world together,” said Stephanie Clary, mission outreach and communication coordinator.
 
A Year of Creation Committee comprised of scientists, activists and people of faith has been formed to assist with this initiative. Committee members include:
  • Brian Tokar, Lecturer in Environmental Studies at the University of Vermont and a board member of 350Vermont and the Institute for Social Ecology 
  • David Mullin, Executive Director of Green Mountain Habitat for Humanity
  • Dcn. Phil Lawson, Director of the Office of Evangelization and Catechesis for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington
  • Ellen Kane, Executive Director of Development and Communications for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington and the Vermont Catholic Community Foundation
  • Fr. Thomas Houle, OFM Cap., Pastor of St. Peter Church in Rutland (first parish in the diocese to adopt renewable energy) and St. Alphonsus Church in Pittsford
  • Betsy Hardy, Coordinator for Vermont Interfaith Power and Light
  • James Ehlers, Executive Director of Lake Champlain International 
  • Stephanie Clary, Mission Outreach and Communication Coordinator for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington
  • Mary Quinn, RSM, Co-Director of Mercy Farm Eco-Spiritual Center in Benson 
  • Marybeth Christie Redmond, a writer-journalist and communications professional for global and local non-profit organizations  
  • Joseph Gainza, Producer and Host of “Gathering Peace” on WGDR and WGDH 
  • Gina Fiorile, a junior at the University of Vermont studying environmental studies and public communications 
  • Maura Thompson, a senior at Rice Memorial High School, involved in Campus Ministry and Global Unity and Solidarity Group

The committee will be working an awareness campaign and events throughout the year, including:
  • Spring issue of Vermont Catholic dedicated to Year of Creation;
  • "The Stations of the Cross with John Paul II: On the Path of Ecological Conversion" and Global Catholic Climate Movement's Lenten Fast for Climate Justice on March 3;
  • Statewide Catholic schools care for creation education, prayer and action project on April 12;
  • "Mercy for Our Common Home" evening prayer and "green parish" roundtable discussion for Mercy2Earth Weekend on April 23;
  • Year of Creation Conference with keynote speaker Dr. Carolyn Woo in September;
  • “Laudato Si’ in the Parish” training program offered to pastors, deacons, catechists;
  • Vermontcatholic.org/yearofcreation webpage with resources for parishes and anyone interested in learning more. 
 
------------------
Updated: 02.07.17
  • Published in Diocesan
Subscribe to this RSS feed
Bishop's Fund Annual Appeal