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CRS presentation at Rice Memorial High School

Jacques Kabore, partnership and capacity building coordinator for Catholic Relief Services Burkina Faso, asks students at Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington to participate in the annual Lenten project. (Vermont Catholic/Cori Fugere Urban) Jacques Kabore, partnership and capacity building coordinator for Catholic Relief Services Burkina Faso, asks students at Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington to participate in the annual Lenten project.
Jacques Kabore, partnership and capacity building coordinator for Catholic Relief Services Burkina Faso, gave students at Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington an idea of what life is like in his homeland:
 
+ Seventy-six percent of households have no food stock on hand.
+ Most people have limited access to safe drinking water, health facilities, schools and sanitation.
+ Only half of households have toilets.
+ Inconsistent and insufficient rains cause crop failures.
+ Women’s literacy is 11 percent in rural areas; 23 percent nationally.
+ 80 percent of the population is engaged in agriculture and livestock production.
 
“You are in a privileged way, a privileged life,” he told the Catholic high school students Jan. 26. “The world is not everywhere like this” in Vermont.
 
Rice is one of 11 CRS global high schools, part of a program that provides opportunities for Catholic secondary schools to join with CRS to educate about Catholic social teaching and advocate for solidarity with the global poor.
 
Kabore shared with the students what life is like in Burkina Faso, one of the four poorest countries in the world. He said people there work hard, yet 46 percent live on less than $1 a day; many carry water for household use from rivers.
 
CRS is working to help residents of Burkina Faso, and since 1960, 500,000 people have been served in areas like agriculture; water, sanitation and hygiene; nutrition and governance. “Your support [of CRS] is doing something fabulous in the world,” Kabore said, adding that CRS also helps with emergency responses like helping 58,000 refugees from Mali get food and water.
 
“Jesus tells us to feed and care for our brothers and sisters,” he said, and CRS is a way for “the hand of God from here [to reach] to overseas.”
 
After the school-wide assembly, students were given the well known cardboard CRS Rice Bowls and asked to make sacrifices of food and specialty drinks during Lent and to contribute the savings to the CRS signature project to help people in need throughout the world.

Kabore spoke at four locations in Vermont as part of the CRS Lenten Speakers Tour, including parishes in Manchester and Bennington and schools in Bennington and South Burlington.
 
Catholic Relief Services carries out the commitment of the bishops of the United States to assist the poor and vulnerable overseas. It is motivated by the Gospel of Jesus Christ to cherish, preserve and uphold the sacredness and dignity of all human life, foster charity and justice and embody Catholic social and moral teaching while promoting human development by responding to major emergencies, fighting disease and poverty and nurturing peaceful and just societies; and by serving Catholics in the United States as they live their faith in solidarity with their brothers and sisters throughout the world.
 
For more information, visit crs.org.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Last modified onFriday, 26 January 2018 16:43
Cori Fugere Urban

Cori Urban is a longtime writer for the communications efforts of the Diocese of Burlington and former editor of The Vermont Catholic Tribune.

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